War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0439 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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last few days ordered by the Adjutant-Generala away from this department viz:

Captain J. C. Davis, artillery; Captain H. B. Hendershott, artilleery; Captain J. M. Schofield, artillery; Lieutenant A. M. Randol, First Artillery; Major W. L. Elliott, First Cavalry; Lieutenant L. Merrill, First Cavalry; also the officers of Companies B and E, Second Infantry, names not known.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, December 16, 1861.

Colonel J. W. BIRGE,

Commandign Sharpshooters, Centralia, Mo.:

COLONEL: As soon as you have cleaned out Centralia, Strugeon, and Renick, and the roads leading to Columbia and Fayette, I wish you to turn your attention to the rebels about Huntsville, Randolph County, and Mexico, Anderson County. You will arrest not only enemies in arms, but all who aid and assist them, and you will have it distictly understood everywhere that rebels will be punished and Union men protected; but the latter, in order to deserve protection, must do something for themselves. Induce them to unite the protection of your forces in that part of the country and form companies of State Militia. Heretofore probably many have been deterred from acting in self-defense against rebels from a fear that the Union troops might finally abandon this State. This will never be done. Missouri is and must remain in the Union and all rebels must be driven out or punished. There must be no more half-way measures, and there can be no middle course of individual neutrality. All citizens who are not rebels must loyally support the Government. If they aid rebels, they are traitors; if they refuse aid to the cause of the Union, they are disloyal, and by this disloyalty give countenance to those who are openly enemies.

Both classes will be treated as their conduct deserves. Those who are not for us will be regarded as against us. We must know who are friends and who are enemies; the line will be distinctly drawn. There can be no individual neutrality in the rear in Missouri. Let the people where you go distinctly understand this.

It is that parties of men are cutting down telegraph posts and attempting to destroy the railroad. Shoot down every one engaged in such attempt and put in close confinement every one who had done so; also seize every one making signal-fires or who conveys information to the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., December 16, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The expedition up the river will probably be in Booneville to-morrow. The river is falling, and I doubt the expediency of trying to get above there with boats, unless you have strong reasons. General Pope has a small force at Booneville to co-operate against Fayette, and if anything further is to be done there should be an experienced com-