War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0249 Chapter XVIII. PEA RIDGE, OR ELKHORN TAVERN, ARK.

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sacrifice of two of his famous generals on the field, is sufficient proof of the valor and patriotism of the troops displayed in every conflict with the enemy. Both officers and men fought with a courage and determination seldom excelled, and will ever entitle them to the gratitude of a grateful country.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JEFF. C DAVIS,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain T. I. McKENNY,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Army of the Southwest.

Numbers 18. Report of Colonel Thomas Pattison, Eighteenth Indiana Infantry, commanding First Brigade.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION,

March 10, 1862.

SIR: In accordance with your order, and as is customary in such cases, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the brigade under my command in achieving the complete victory over the enemy in the late battles fought on the 7th and 8th instant, at Leetown and Elkhorn Tavern, in Benton County, Arkansas.

On the morning of the 6th, in obedience to your command, I moved my brigade-consisting of the Eighteenth Indiana Regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Washburn; the Eighth Indiana, under Colonel Benton; the Twenty-second Indiana, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hendricks, and the First Indiana Battery, of six field pieces, under Captain Klauss- and took possession of the hills on the north side of Sugar Creek and immediately west of the principal Telegraph road from Springfield to Fort Smith, the Twenty-second occupying the left on the ridge next the road, the Eighth with Klauss' battery, in the center, on another prominent point, and the Eighteenth on the next ridge to the right, each point being separated by deep ravines, extending back a considerable distance in the direction of the Cassville road. Colonel Benton and Lieutenant-Colonel Washburn, in compliance with orders, set their respective commands to work, throwing up in the course of five hours quite a respectable breastwork, which, in case of an attack from the direction of Cross Hollow, would have been an excellent defense.

On the night of the 6th the brigade bivouacked in this position. Nothing of moment transpired until about 10 o'clock of the 7th, when artillery firing was heard a mile or to our right rear; also heavy firing in the direction of Cassville, immediately in our rear. The Twenty-second having in the mean time been ordered by you to re-enforce Colonel Vandever, near the village of Leetown, the left wing of the Eighth, under Lieutenant-Colonel Shunk, and Captain Klauss, with one section and a half of his battery, were ordered to support Colonel Carr, whose division, in conjunction with General Asboth's, was then engaged with Price's force near Elkhorn Tavern.

About 2 p.m. I received your order to proceed with the Eighteenth to the scene of action, which order was executed with dispatch by Lieutenant-Colonel Washburn. On arriving I found the Twenty-second in line of battle on the left and rear of Davidson's Peoria battery, which was in position in the southeast corner of a large open field. We im-