War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0194 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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with a flag of truce to attend to the duty of collecting and interring the bodies of the officers and men who fell during the engagements of the 7th and 8th instant.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

EARL VAN DORN,

Major-General, Confederate Army.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Pea Ridge, Ark., March 9, 1862.

EARL VAN DORN,

Commanding Confederate Forces:

SIR: The general commanding is in receipt of yours of the 9th, saying that in accordance with the usages of war you send a party to collect and bury the dead. I am directed to say all possible facilities will be given for burying the dead, many of which have already been interred. Quite a number of your surgeons have fallen into our hands and are permitted to act under parole, and under a general order from Major-General Halleck further liberty will be allowed them if such accommodations be reciprocated by you. The general regrets that we find on the battle-field, contrary to civilized warfare, many of the Federal dead who were tomahawked, scalped, and their bodies shamefully mangled, and expenses a hope that this important struggle may not degenerate to a savage warfare.

By order of Brigadier General S. R. Curtis:

T. I. McKENNY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Pea Ridge, Ark., March 11, 1862.

SIR: I have finished burying the dead and made the best provisions I can for the wounded. Two divisions have advanced 6 miles, and my cavalry has scoured the country this side Fayetteville. The enemy has retreated, as before, beyond the Boston Mountains. I send forward prisoners, some 500.

In reference to a verbal communication from General Van Dorn, I have expressed a willingness to exchange prisoners of equivalent rank, and hope in this way to obtain some officers that I very much desire. It is warm, delightful weather, and roads are excellent. I move my headquarters near to Bentonville, to get away from the stench and desolation of the battle ground, and the better to overlook the approaches to the Boston Mountains. A scout informs me that forces were to advance from Fort Scott five or six days ago, but that Hunter and Lane were both absent. What is the matter out there?

Respectfully,

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.