War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0165 Chapter XVIII. NEW MADRID, MO., AND ISLAND Numbers 10, ETC.

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and stood on the bank of the river as they came in to direct them where to go. Colonel Grantt was sent to put some of his men to work with axes to cut up the gun-carriages, and also to make sure that all of his and Smith's men had come in. Subsequently I sent Captain Stewart again, with such of his men as he could find, to see that the gun-carriages were as thoroughly demolished as was possible. The ordnance officer had reported to me at once that all the ammunition was out of the magazine. Some of it was left behind, piled up near the magazine. How much I am unable to say, but do not think it possible that any large amount could have been left. The men had intended passing the night in the fort, and had taken with them from their quarters their personal effects. These were carried abroad the gunboats or put on the wharf boat. After seeing, as I supposed, that the men were either on board or on their way to the boats, and learning from Colonel Gantt that he had himself called in the companies from the rifle trench and had been through his camp to see that no stragglers were left, I went aboard the Polk and did not return again to the shore. I had gone on the boat twice before to hunt officers to send after their men, and also to get a few minutes' relief from fatigue and the violence of the storm. There was no appearance of a panic among the men. Between 3 and 4 o'clock the boats left, the Livingston having the wharf boat in tow and steamed down to Tiptonville, whence I was ordered to Island Numbers 10 by General McCowan about 7 o'clock in the evening. I did not think it possible to get what mules Colonel Gantt had in his command aboard the boats, and suggested to him that they ought to be turned loose, in which I understood Captain Gantt had in his command aboard the boats, and suggested to him that they ought to be turned loose, in which I understood Captain Carer to concur. I did not think the boats had capacity enough for them. The two artillery companies occupied tents, the infantry being mostly in huts. I directed the artillery officers before the boats left to make an effort to get their tents, the infantry being mostly in huts. I directed the artillery officers before the boats left ot make an effort to get their tents on board. They subsequently reported that they could not get many of the men together in the darkness and rain or induce the few whom they did collect to do anything at it.

The above is, so far as I can remember, a correct account of that part of the evacuation which came under my own observation. It was impossible for me to see much of what was done by others, or to control the men under the circumstances, to whom I was personally a comparative stranger.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. P. STEWART,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

Numbers 36. Report of Brigadier General E. W. Gantt, C. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE,

Madrid Bend, Mo., March 17, 1862.

SIR: About midnight on the evening of the 12th instant firing on our picket lines in front of Fort Thompson was announced to me, and shortly afterwards a courier came, in notifying me that some movements of the enemy (who, you are aware, were in force some tow and a half miles from us for more than a week) were about taking place. I dispatched discreet scouts from my command to repair there at once and ascertain definitely, if possible, the character of the enemy, the character of the enemy's move-