War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0031 Chapter XVIII. OPERATIONS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

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had completely routed them from the mountain, and then the first struggle ended, the company killing some 20 of the enemy and wounding some 9 or 10. The number killed in my company was 2 - Privates F. Lane and H. E. Wilson. One slightly wounded.

A portion of my command, under Lieutenant I. H. Wright - whose gallantry on the occasion deserves praise - continued the pursuit some 7 or 8 miles, killing and wounding several more. It gives me pleasure to states that my small command did battle with a courage and heroism scarcely equaled.

The engagement on the 26th continued some three or four hours. For such a signal and glorious victory the highest praise is due our gallant commander.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

H. S. BENNETT,

Captain, Lamar Cavalry.

Colonel McINTOSH, Commanding Forces.

No. 16. Report of Colonel James McIntosh, Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles, commanding division, of skirmish with Creeks and Seminoles.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, Fort Smith, Ark., January 10, 1862.

GENERAL: In my report to you in regard to the captured property taken at Chustenahlah I should have stated that 190 sheep were turned over to the commissary, Captain Lanigan, at Fort Gibson.

Since writing that communication I have received a report from Colonel Watie, commanding Cherokee regiment (who I left behind to collect the stock taken from the Indians), stating he brought back with him between 800 and 800 head of cattle and 250 Indian ponies. Colonel Cooper, who marched with his command of Indians over the ground two or three days after the battle, also found a number of cattle, which were secured. All this property is in addition to what I have hitherto reported.

Colonel Watie also reports that on his return to Grand River from the battle-field, he having ascertained that a company of Cherokees numbering 50 or 60 were near his camp,making their way northward, with arms in their hands, sent two companies to arrest them. In endeavoring to accomplish this 1 Cherokee was killed and 7 made prisoners. Their wagons and some of their arms fell into the hands of Colonel Watie. From an officer just in from Colonel Cooper's command I ascertain that Hopoeithleyohola has gone to Kansas, and has not more than 400 or 500 Creeks with him. Many of the Indians who espoused his cause have left him the battle, and are now anxious to come in and make a treaty. As we have made them entirely destitute, I think all but Hopoeithleyohola's immediate followers will come in.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

JAMES McINTOSH,

Colonel, Commanding.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General C. S. Forces, Richmond, Va.