War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0029 Chapter XVIII. OPERATIONS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

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A, B, E, F, and G. To these were attached a few from other companies in the regiment, in all about 350 men. Company A was commanded by Sergt. R. B. Gause, Company B by Lieutenant M. D. Ector, Company E by Captain D. M. Short, Company F by Captain Isham Chisum, and Company G by Lieutenant O. A. Durrum. Our advance guard, in command of Captain Short, being fired upon by the enemy, stood firm until our force came up. It was at once, evident that thee enemy were in force and had taken a very strong position, protected and sheltered to a great extent by trees and rocks, with an open prairie in front of them. I was ordered to charge the strongest point of the enemy. When the regiments had taken the different positions assigned them the bugle sounded the charge. As we approached the foot of the hill the enemy opened a heavy fire upon us. No confusion was created by it in our advancing columns. Many of the enemy made for their stronghold on the top of the hill, where there was a natural breastwork of rocks, and fired over the rocks at us. Many of my men, without making any halt, gained the heights by the few entrances on the side where it was alone accessible, while others dismounted and scaled the rock, and here for a short time a desperate struggle ensued. Many shots were fired when the contending parties were only in a few steps of each other, and in some instances they were engaged in a hand-to-hand struggle. Soon the point was cleared by us and the enemy retreated in great confusion, some of them making a stand for a short time in the deep gorges and rocky defiles of the mountains. When we had completely scattered and routed those who had made a stand against us, hearing a heavy firing northeast, I obliqued with my command in that direction, and joined Stone's regiment, with which I co-operated during the remainder of the battle, going where from the firing we would be most likely to come up with the largest bodies of the enemy. We continued in the pursuit until one hour by sun in the evening.

It is due to all those in command of companies to say that they deserve great credit for the manner they led their companies into the charge and for their conduct throughout the battle. The truth is, every officer and private in my command acted gallantly and to my entire satisfaction during the engagement. I am proud indeed that at such a time it was my fortune to command such men. When I consider the position occupied by the enemy, I deem in nothing but due to you to state that the battle was admirably planned, and was executed by the different commands in a manner calculated to reflect great credit on our arms.

Yours, very respectfully,

W. P. LANE,

Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding South Kansas-Texas Cavalry.

JAMES McINTOSH,

Colonel, Commanding, and Acting Brigadier-General.

No. 14. Report of Captain William Gipson, Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles, of engagement of Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

DECEMBER 28, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken in the battle of Chustenahlah by the battalion of your regiment