War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0027 Chapter XVIII. OPERATIONS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

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and we proceeded to gather up the killed and wounded, which we succeeded in doing, and reached camp a little after dark.

My regiment killed 211, viz: BY the staff,3; a detachment of 36 men from companies of Captains Twitty, Reeves, and Young, commanded by Captain J. D. Young, killed 34; Captain Harman's company killed 16; Captain Burk's company killed 30; Captain Nicholson's company killed 16; Captain Bound's company killed 26; Captain Featherston's company killed 10; Captain Hill's company killed 26; Captain Wallace's company, 50. Total killed, 211.

Our loss killed on the field was 1 private, William Franklin, Captain Harman's company; mortally wounded, Sergt. W. H. H. Addington, of Captain Young's detachment, and W. S. Proctor, of Captain Wallis' company; and J. N. Robinson, of Captain Wallis' company, severely wounded, left arm broken; slightly wounded, Captain J. D. Young, in the thigh, and Benjamin Clark, private in Captain Featherston's company, wounded in the leg. Total killed and wounded, 6. In Captain Nicholson's company 3 horses shot, and in Captain Harman's company 3 horses shot. Captain Featherston's company lost -; Captain Hill's,1 killed. In Captain Wallis' company 1 horse killed and 1 disabled. In Captain Burk's company 1 horse lost.

We took a great many women, children, and negroes prisoners; also a number of horses and cattle, which were turned over, by your order, to Captain Gipson, of the Arkansas regiment.

In conclusion, I am proud to say that both officers and men of my regiment behaved throughout the engagement as became soldiers and Texans.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. C. YOUNG,

Colonel, Commanding Texas Cavalry.

No. 12. Report of Lieutenant Colonel John S. Griffith, Sixth Regiment Texas Cavalry, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH TEXAS REGIMENT, Camp Homing Creek, Cherokee Nation, December 27, 1861.

COLONEL: On the 26th instant, at 12 m., I was ordered by you to move my command up on the right of and parallel with Colonel Lane's command. This executed brought me to Hominy Creek, when I was further ordered to dismounted my men and form a line. When Colonel Lane made his gallant charge on the enemy I ordered my men to their horses, formed, and rapidly advanced in a flanking movement you intended for me to make up the valley for half a mile, crossed over to the west, or battle side of the creek, proceeded a short distance up, and discovered the enemy upon the opposite bank. I charged across the creek, put the enemy to rout, continued up the valley something like a half mile farther, cutting off all the straggling and then flying Indians in that direction. I then turned to the left in a northwestward direction over the rocky hills and gorges that made into the large gorge that was then in between Colonel Lane's command and mine. Continuing this course, I crossed over five or six rocky hills, on three of which, behind the rocks, the enemy were in position in considerable numbers. My men gallantly charged in succession, putting them completely to rout. It was during these charges that the brave and gallant Lieutenant Fitzhue and Thomas Arnold fell among the foremost in the fight.