War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0026 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

BARNSVILLE, KANS., September 11, 1861.

The CHICKASAWS AND CHOCTAWS

Who are loyal to the U. S. Government:

FRIENDS AND BROTHERS: The commissioners of the United States would like to meet delegations from your nations at the headquarters of the Kansas brigade, where they will confer with you. The Indians who are true to the Government will always and everywhere be treated as friends by her armies. Your rights will be held sacred; you will be protected in person and property. It is only over the enemies of government and law that an avenging hand will be raised.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

E. H. CARRUTH,

Commissioner of U. S. Government.

HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Barnsville, September 11, 1861.

TUSAQUACH, Chief of the Wichitas:

FRIEND AND BROTHER: It is the wish of the commissioner of the United States Government that you either come to Kansas with you firnds the Seminoles or send two or three of your best braves. We also want the Keechies, Ionies, Cadoes, and the Comanches to send some of their men to meet and have a talk with the commissioners of your Great Father at Washington. His soldiers are as swift as the antelope and brave as the mountain bear, and they are your friends and brothers. They will give you powder and lead. They will fight by your sides. Your friend Black Beaver will meet you here, and we will drive away the bad men who entered you company last spring. The Texans have killed the Wichitas; we will punish the Texans.

Come with your friends the Seminoles.

Your brother,

E. H. CARRUTH,

Commissioner for the U. S. Government.

No. 11. Report of Colonel W. C. Young, Eleventh Texas Cavalry, of engagement at Chustenahlah, Cherokee Nation.

SIR: I have the honor to report the action of my regiment in the engagement of the 26th December. I took up my position on the left, according to your instructions, at the commencement of the action. I remained there until the woods were on fire, and being satisfied that the enemy did not intend an attack on our left, I moved my regiment in the direction of the mountains, on the right. On moving up the first mountain I passed Major Chilton, of Colonel Greer's regiment, who was wounded in the head, and learning from him the direction the enemy had taken, I moved my regiment in an oblique direction through the mountains, where after going some 2 miles, we came up with the enemy, strongly posted among the rocks and timber. We immediately charged them, carrying everything before us. After this the enemy, being copletely routed, ran in different directions. My regiment then pursued them in detachment of companies, keeping up a running fight until 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The regiment was then rallied,