War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0018 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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circumstances of their situation, was highly honorable to them. The teamsters present also deported themselves in a creditable manner throughout.

The causes which led to the dispersion of the regiment arose from a misconception of the character of the conflict between the Creeks, from an indisposition on their part to engage in strife with their immediate neighbors, and from the panic gotten up by the threatened attack upon us. The regiment will be promptly filled and ready for service.

For the very kind manner in which you were pleased to speak of myself and those who adhered to their obligations in your note calling for this report I beg you to accept my grateful acknowledgments.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN DREW,

Colonel, Commanding First Regiment Cherokee Mounted Riflemen.

Colonel D. H. COOPER,

Commanding Indian Department.

No. 6. Report of Colonel William B. Sims, Ninth Texas Cavalry, of engagement at Chusto-Talasah.

REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS, Fort Gibson, Ind. T., December 15, 1861.

SIR: At the commencement of the engagement on the 9th instant with Hopoeithleyohola's forces on Bird Creek, Cherokee Nation, in obedience to you commands I proceeded to divide the detachment of my regiment, amounting to about 260 men,into two divisions, sending Lieutenant-Colonel Quayle, with about 50 of Captain Berry's company, commanded by himself,an small detachment from the following companies: Captain McColl's, under Lieutenant Brown; Captain Hart's, under Lieutenant Black; Captain Williams', under Lieutenant Bowen; and Captain Brinson's, under, Lieutenant Utley; amounting in all to about 100 men. He advance with his command on to the creek, to the left of the Choctaw regiment. Not finding the enemy there, he returned and charged a ravine on the right of the Choctaws, which he succeeded in taking, under a heavy fire from the enemy. Driving them from their position, he marched on and charged another ravine still farther on the right, but when he got into the ravine the Indians, who had possession of its mouth, opened a raking fire upon his men. He ordered them to charge down the ravine, which they did, and put the enemy to rout. A party of Indians still kept up a heavy fire upon them from the right, who were at first supposed to be Choctaws, as they were wearing our badges, but they were deserted Cherokees and Creeks. In the last charge with Colonel Quayle there were about 20 Choctaws, who acted with the greatest bravery.

With the men under my command, to wit, parts of four companies, under command of Captains Duncan, English, Wright, and Smith, after having dismounted I charged to the right of Colonel McIntosh's command and put the Indians to flight without firing a gun. I then ordered my men to mount their right, about half a mile, where we dismounted, charged into the creek bottom, and put the Indians to flight.