War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0017 Chapter XVIII. OPERATIONS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

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forenoon of Saturday, the 7th instant. It consisted the evening of that day of about 480 men, rank and rifle. The hostile Creeks were encamped from 6 to 8 miles distant.

The day following, under you instructions and with the concurrence of Colonel McIntosh, commanding the Creek regiment, I authorized Major Pegg to assure Hopoeithleyohola and party of your desire for a peaceable settlement of the difficulty with the Creeks, and that you had no wish to prosecute a war against them. Major Pegg was accompanied to the Creek camps by Capts. George W. Scraper and J. P. Davis and Rev. Lewis Downing. Before they returned and late the evening I found that there were only about 60 men in camp, and that a report was circulating that we were to be attacked by an overwhelming force then at hand. I ordered my horse to be saddled, and while in the act of [throwing] a blanket on my saddle Captain Benge came up and said we had better be off, as the enemy were upon us. After proceeding a part of the way to your camp the party returned to secure the ammunition. Major Pegg was then in camp,and reported that he had seen a large number of warriors painted for battle, who would be down upon us that night, and that he had been allowed only on the plea of removing some women and children from danger. This renewed the excitement, and as it [was] now quite dark, the party dispersed in squads. Information had been conveyed to you of the dispersion of the regiment, and while myself, Captain Fields, and a few others were making our way to your camp the squadron of Texas cavalry, which had been instructed to secure the public property in our camp, was fallen in with. This prompt movement saved my train, tents, &c.

Major Pegg, Adjt. James S. Vann, Capts. Davis and J. D. Hicks, Lieuts. S. H. Smith, Jesse Henry, Anderson Benge, Trotting Wolf, and several privates pursued their way to Fort Gibson.

Captains Vann, Pike, and Scraper,and Lieutenants White-Catcher, Eli Smith, Foster, Bearmeat, and N. Fish, with parts of their companies, were missing, and doubtless were in the camp of Hopoeithleyohola or made their way there.

Captain James McDaniel and Lieuts. Wat Stop, N. D. Bear, and Skieyaltooka were absent, but were almost certainly at the same place.

The unarmed portion of the regiment - which consisted in the aggregate of about 1,200 in number - were left at this place in camp, with the following officers: Lieutenant Colonel William P. Ross, commanding; Captain N. B. Sanders, and Lieutenants Sanders, Hawkins, Ahmer-cher-ner, Crab-grass Smith, Fogg, Little Bird, Young, Webber, Downing, Drew, Ulteesky, and Deer-in-Water, and a surgeon - Corden.

The following-named officers and privates were with me in your camp and present at the battle of Bird Creek on the 9th instant: Company F: Captain Richard Fields, whose horse was shot; Lieutenant Broom Baldridge, killed; Sergt. Dempsey Handle, and Privates Creek McCoy, Situwakee, and Tracker. Company D: Captain J. N. Hidebrand and Lieuts. George Springston and Ezekiel Russell, Private Nelson Hogshooter. Company H: Captain E. R. Hicks, Lieutenant George W. Ross, Sergts. William Hewbanks, Allan Ross, and Peter; Privates Henry Meigs, Richard Robinson, Carter Oo-yor-lor-cha-he, and Coming Deer. Company K: Captain Pickens M. Benge, Lieutenant George Benge, Privates Oliver Ross, Thomas Ross, Broad Christy, Thomas Yah-hoo-lar, and Adam (a Creek); Surg. James P. Evans, and Expressmen William S. Coodey.

The deportment of these few officers and men, under the peculiar

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