War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0012 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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nor any companies from Colonel Greer's regiment ever did so (I presume the order previously given was received), but formed part of the separate column Colonel McIntosh had determined to put in motion. No objection was made by me to the change in Colonel McIntosh's intentions. On the contrary, I afforded all the information in my possession as to the situation of Hopoeithleyohola's camp and the surrounding country, and it was understood we were to co-operate,moving the one up the Arkansas and the other up the Verdigris. Colonel McIntosh also promised me a supply of ammunition from what he had brought along. On the 20th, with Major Whitfield's battalion and Captain Welch's squadron, I returned to Choska, after entering into a satisfactory arrangement with Colonel Drew and the chief in regard to the reorganization of Colonel Drew's regiment.

Colonel Drew's regiment, when reorganized, was ordered to join me at Choska, and also the available force of Colonel Sims' regiment December 21 I wrote to Colonel James McIntosh, to know when he would be ready and for ammunition; in answer to which, on the same day he fixed upon the next at 12 o'clock for the commencement of his march with the largest part of his forces, and the next morning, the 23d, for the departure of the rest; their destination Mrs. McNair's, on the Verdigris, distance from Hopoeithleyohola's camp about 25 miles, stating that he would reach Mrs. Mcnair's on the morning of the 24th, expressing the opinion that it would not be well to remain at Mrs. McNairs' more than one day, and that he would like to see and concert measures with me on the evening of the 24th, and proposing to meet me at any point I might designate;that it was his design to co-operate with me in any measure for the welfare of the country, &c. This I was then satisfied his precipitancy would render impracticable; nevertheless, having on the night of the 23rd received at Choska the promised ammunition, I marched the next day for Tulsey Town, and informed Colonel McIntosh by letter that it would be impossible to reach, that place before the 26th; that Colonel Stand Watie was ordered to be at Mrs. McNair's, on the Verdigris, December 25; that his (Colonel McIntosh's) well-appointed command was too fast for mine, but if Colonel Stand Watie joined him I supposed he would have force enough.

On my arrival at Tulsey Town on the evening of the 26th a letter reached me by express from Colonel Stand Watie, dated December 25, at Mingo Creek (which is some 12 miles west of Mrs. McNair's, in the direction of Hopoeithleyohola's camp),informing me that Colonel McIntosh had gone, on but as he was only 6 miles in advance he hoped to overtake him. Colonel McIntosh pushed on without waiting even for Colonel Stand Watie, and attacked Hopoeithleyohola. Colonel Stand Watie, however, followed the enemy the next day, overtook him, some 300 strong, had a running fight, and killed 15 of the enemy, without the loss of a man. Hopoeithleyohola, it is said, had gone on with about 200 warriors and made his escape. I also heard on the morning of the 27th that Colonel McIntosh had attacked and dispersed the Indians. It was therefore useless for me to reach the rear of the enemy by way of the Cherokee settlement in the Big Bend of the Arkansas. The only change to effect any good was to pursue the enemy by the nearest route. Accordingly I marched for Parks', on Shoal Creek, and there on the 28th, met Colonel McIntosh returning to winter quarters. On the 29th I moved up Bird Creek and camped on the Osage trail to the Big Bend, having discovered during the day foot-prints and other evidences that the enemy had gone up Bird Creek.

The next morning early we struck a plain trail, and followed it a little