War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0011 Chapter XVIII. OPERATIONS IN INDIAN TERRITORY.

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estimate,and, although calculated to dishearten them, was of less importance, than the moral effect produced. They had learned that their superior numbers could not compensate for the determined valor of our troops and that they could not successful meet them in combat; that whenever we could find them we could defeat them, and that without material aid from abroad Hopoeithleyohola's party must be entirely destroyed. Impressed with the conviction, the main body of Hopoeithleyohola's army retired hastily towards Kansas, where an asylum had been offered them. This statement is made by intelligent prisoners,confirmed by the appearance of the trails leading towards Kansas seen on our scout two weeks afterwards.

My supply of ammunition being nearly exhausted, and having on my arrival at Van's, the night of December 10, learned that a body of Cherokees from Fort Gibson, about 100, who passed up the previous evening, had put on the shuck badge (Hopoeithleyohola's) and gone direct to his camp at Shoal Creek, I was impressed with the necessity of placing the force under my command as soon as possible in position to counteract any movement among the people in aid of Hopoeithleyohola and his Northern allies. Colonel Drew, with his train, and Colonel Sims, with the Fourth Texas Cavalry, were ordered on the 11th direct to Fort Gibson, and with the Creek and Choctaw regiment I moved by way of Tulsey Town down the Arkansas. An express was at the same time sent to Colonel James McIntosh, at Van Buren, with an account of the battle at Chusto-Talasah, with a request that he would send some white troops into the Cherokee country, in order that the moral effect of their presence repress any outbreak. We arrived at Choska, in the Creek Nation, 20 miles above Fort Gibson, on the 13th. Leaving the main body of the command there, I hastened with Welch's squadron (Companies I and K, of the Choctaw and Chickasaw regiment) and encamped on Grand River, opposite Fort Gibson. Colonel Sims had already arrived, and was encamped at Fort Gibson.

The arrival of Colonel Drew with the account of our victory over Hopoeitheyohola, the presence of Colonel Sims' regiment, and the knowledge of the proximing of the forces at Choska had already suppressed outward show of sympathy with the enemy. The next day I received a letter from Colonel James McIntosh, dated Van Buren, December 14, 1861, in which he advised that he had just order Colonel Young's regiment, Whitfield's battalion, and five companies of Greer's regiment to report to me at Fort Gibson or wherever I might be found; that he had ordered Captain Con. Rea, ordnance officer at Fort Smith, to honor my requisition for ammunition, and Major Clark to furnish supplies immediately, and that he hoped with this additional force I would be able to march against Hopoeithleyohola with certainty of success, &c. An express was immediately started back to Fort Smith with a requisition for ammunition. I remained still at Fort Gibson to see the Principal Chief of the Cherokees, Hon. John Ross, and confer with him on the state of affairs among the Cherokees.

On the 19th a letter was received from Lieutenant-Colonel Diamond, commanding Colonel Young's regiment, reporting that he would reach Fort Gibson on the 20th. On the evening of that day I crossed over to Fort Gibson, for the purpose of addressing the Cherokees, in conjunction with the chief, on the existing state of affairs among them,and greatly to my surprise found Colonel James McIntosh, who announced his intention of taking the field with some 2,000 strong against Hopoeithleyohola. Major Whitfield, with his battalion, crossed Grand River early next morning and reported to me. Neither Colonel Young's regiment