War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0909 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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tion at Donelson I have had my official report published. My judgment is that there is but one remedy for existing condition of things; that is, abandon sea-coast defenses except New Orleans; concentrate all the forces in Tennessee; drive the enemy north of the Ohio River, and press invasion of Ohio, Indiana. That means will draw enemy's forces back and relieve the heart of country, and give up control of interior rivers until we can get power on water-causes. Enemy can inflict no great calamity on sea-coast.

If we do not relieve heart of the country, Mississippi River will be opened, and then cause of South is desperate.

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS C. S. FORCES, Corinth, Miss., February 26, 1862.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Commanding Jackson, Tenn.:

DEAR GENERAL: I had the honor to received yesterday your letter of the 24th instant, and have acted upon your suggestions on such points as have not been anticipated.

1st. I have held the Tennessee River from Pittsburgh to Florence under observation for some days past. I have stationed Colonel Clanton's regiment Alabama cavalry at Florence, to scout and draw supplies from the north side of the river. I have sent two 24-pounder guns, with munitions, to the Florence Bridge, with instructions to Brigadier General L. P. Walker to establish a battery on the south bank, at or near a point sent Colonel Mounton, Eighteenth Louisiana Volunteers, with Captain Gibson's field battery and a detachment of cavalry, to Pittsburgh and vicinity, to hold the country and river under close observation, and to attack the enemy's gunboats and transports in the event of his appearance and scout down the river valley. The intermediate portion of the river is also held under close observation. I have ordered Major Baskerville and two companies of Mississippi cavalry to the vicinity of Purdy's, opposite Savannah, under the orders of Colonel Mouton. I have also communicated instructions to Colonel Lea, at Henderson Station, and propose, as soon as possible, to give that district my personal attention.

2nd. I have ordered the bridges guarded between this and Tuscumbia, and am about to do so en route against publicity, and hold the railroad trains under some measure of security.

4th. I have obtained some ordnance stores and expect more, and commenced repairing arms.

5th. I have instructed the depot commissary to obtain 10,000 rations for thirty days at this station, and propose doing the same at Decatur or some suitable point on that extension of my line.

6th. I have directed the issue of fresh beef five days in seven when practicable.

7th. I have sent one officer to bring me full information about Columbia, Tenn., and the condition of our communications with Nashville, &c.