War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0871 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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missary of your post. I shall continue to draw supplies of subsistence to this place until I have a heavy store on hand.

I have established a line of vedettes on the east bank of the Cumberland to within 8 miles of Smithland, so that I will be posted to the movements and advance of the enemy.

I hope you will order forward at once the tents and baggage of the troops of General Buckner's command, as they are suffering very much for most of them this cold weather.

I must request that you will forward this letter after reading it to General Johnston. My engagements and duties press me so much that I cannot address you both and, knowing his anxiety, I am anxious to place before him the intelligence contained in this letter.

With great respect,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CAMP SIX MILES EAST OF PARIS,

February 10, 1862.

Major-General POLK:

Your dispatch to destroy the bridges and trestle between Paris and Danville is just received. The bridge across the Tennessee River is not destroy. Do you still order to destroy the bridges and trestle work? I do not yet think it is necessary.

J. H. MILLER,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

CAMP TWELVE MILES EAST OF PARIS,

February 10, 1862-1 p. m.

Major-General POLK:

SIR: One hundred feet of the trestle work on each side of the bridge over the Tennessee River had been destroyed by the enemy. Heavy firing has been heard this morning in the direction of Fort Donelson. I am now on my way to execute your orders in respect to the bridges and trestle work between Paris and the river. I still think it unnecessary, as we could destroy it at any moment. A large quantity of wheat and flour can yet be gotten away, and the people are relying upon the railroad to remove their things. Please reply immediately.

J. H. MILLER,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 33.

Richmond, February 10, 1862.

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II. On the application of Major General George B. Crittenden, a court of inquiry, to consist of three members and a recorder, to be detailed by General A. S. Johnson, commanding Department Numbers 2, will assemble at such time and place as in the judgment of that commander the interests of the service will permit, to examine into all the circumstances relating to the battle of Fishing Creek and the movements subsequent to that event.