War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0806 OPERATIONS IN KY., TENN., N. ALA., AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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himself or family. He now desires to withdraw himself and family from the jurisdiction of those States. He makes this application, not as a petitioner for any grace or favor, but as a demand of right, and with full confidence that the public faith will in the premises be observed.

Respectfully, &c.,

W. G. BROWNLOW.

[Inclosure A.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, November 20, 1861.

Major-General CRITTENDEN, Cumberland Gap:

DEAR SIR: I have been asked to grant a passport for Mr. Brownlow to leave the State of Tennessee. He is said to have secreted himself, fearing violence to his person, and to be anxious to depart from the State. I cannot give him a formal passport, though I would greatly prefer seeing him on the other side of our lines as an avowed enemy. I wish, however, to say that I would be glad to learn that he has left Tennessee and have no objection to interpose to his leaving if you are willing to let him pass.

Yours, truly,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War

[Inclosure B.]

HEADQUARTERS,

Knoxville, Tenn., December 4, 1861.

W. G. BROWLING, Esq.:

SIR: The major-general commanding directs me to say that upon calling at his headquarters within twenty-four hours you can get a passport to go into Kentucky, accompanied by a military escort, the route to be designated by General Crittenden.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. CUNNINGHAM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure C.]

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA,

District of Tennessee:

To the MARSHAL OF SAID DISTRICT:

J. C. Ramsay, Confederate States district attorney for said district, having made oath before me that he is informed and believes that William G. Brownlow, a citizen of said district and owing allegiance and fidelity to the Confederate States, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil and not having the fear of God before his eyes, did, willfully, knowingly, and with malice aforethought and feloniously, commit the crime of treason against the Confederate States by then and there, within said district and since the 10th day of June last, publishing a weekly and tri-weekly paper known as Brownlow's Knoxville Whig; said paper had a large circulation in said district and also circulated in the United States, and contained weekly divers of editorials written by the said Brownlow, which said editorials were treasonable against the Confederate States of America, and did then and there commit treason and prompt others to commit treason, by speech