War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0740 OPERATIONS IN KY.,TENN.,N.ALA.,AND S.W.VA. Chapter XVII.

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Previous to taking my departure I was called on by a gentleman, whom I know to be truthful, who requested me to inform General Buckner that there were already at that time 80,000 Union troops in Kentucky; that Rosecrans, Schenck, and Benham (I think that is the name) were then on the line of march to Kentucky; that it was the aim of the Union generals to unite against and attack General Buckner at Bowling Green with a force of 120,000 troops; that on the 25th ultimo it was decided to make the attack as soon as the Green River Bridge was done. The gentleman who gave me this information stated that I might give his name to General Buckner. His name is John Caperton. He lives in Louisville, and certainly has a fine opportunity of hearing what is going on the Union side, as he is a son-in-law to Mr. Guthrie.

If my opinion was asked, I would say that I didn't believe the Union army in Kentucky was or could be so large. I will not, however, venture my opinion against Major Caperton's, his advantages for information being much better than mine. I am now in General Clark's room. He says that there will be no such force brought into Kentucky. I do trust that the commanding general at Bowling Green will be prepared against any number.

It was believed by many in Louisville that there would be a simultaneous attack on the Potomac and at Bowling Green. The reasons given were that it would prevent the withdrawing of troops from one post to the other.

I am late in getting this letter to you, but to prevent capture I ran a blockade, which was long and tedious.

I desire you to state these facts to General Buckner, as I was requested to communicate them to him as early as possible.*

Very respectfully,

WM. A. WELLS.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully forward to General Johnston. Mr. Wells, a very intelligent gentleman, is now in Bowling Green.

S. B. BUCKNER,

Brigadier-General.

KNOXVILLE, December 6, 1861.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War:

W. G. Bronwlow arrested to-day for treason by a warrant issued by the Confederate States commissioner and drawn up by myself. Will write you the facts in full that prompted his arrest in a day or two. Hope you will postpone your decision until you hear them.

J. C. RAMSAY.

KNOXVILLE, December 6, 1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL C. S. ARMY:

Will you please send me, without delay, the ten regiments promised by the President whilst I was in Richmond, and I will move into Kentucky at once?

G. B. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding Eastern Division, District Kentucky.

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*Some personal details omitted.

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