War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0729 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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to built two, which are at this time being constructed and will be finished in a few days. Two more will be required, which will be built as soon as the timber can be had.

The pile-driving has progressed rather slow, for reasons out of my power to remedy. (My requisitions receive but little attention at Memphis.) I am now driving in my plan (which was condemned by many), but confess that I am anxiously waiting to witness the effect of high water upon them. I am driving them inclined upstream, and find that the drift, as it lodges, disappears under the water, and seems to remain at the bottom.

If the piles stand, the navigable width of the river will be reduced to about 600 yards, and I think will form as perfect hull-inspectors for boats coming down as to the Mississippi sawyers for boats going up. Now that my men, who were all novices at such work, have got the hang of it, I shall be able to progress very well, if the wind will ever stop blowing. We have but 42 negroes here now and I hear of no more coming. Colonel Williamson is yet absent.

I believe, sir, I have given a correct statement of affairs here, and feel confident that I would be able to give a more flattering one after a second visit to this place by yourself.

It would afford me much pleasure to be engaged mountain a few 32-pounder ship carronades on our rear line, and I understand there are plenty of them at Norfolk.

Most respectfully, &c.,

MONTGOMERY LYNCH,

Captain, Corps Engineers.

CAMP AT POUND GAP, December 1, 1861.

Major General G. B. CRITTENDEN:

SIR: Since I dispatched yesterday your courier upon his return the Fifty-sixth Regiment of Virginia Volunteers, under Colonel Stuart, has been reported to me as at Abingdon, on its way to join my command. It is said to be 600 strong.

I learned yesterday that the enemy occupies Louisa (45 miles from Prestonburg), with a force of 3,000 men, and had signified his expectation to move back to Piketon whenever I moved in that direction. As my column on the Louisa Fork of Sandy River is in motion, and has been for some days, upon Piketon, I think it will be imprudent to send any force from this place to Nashville, and I have therefore countermanded the order for the regiment of Colonel Williams to march to Abingdon.

I shall move from this place to-day en route for Prestonburg, Ky., to which place my orders originally directed me, "to protect and defend that frontier." You are already advised by me that the force present on the frontier consists of-

Williams' regiment................................ 800

Trigg's regiment.................................. 560

Mounted battalion................................. 400

Jeffress' battery................................. 60

--- 1,820

There is ordered up Moore's regiment or battalion,

estimated at...................................... 400

Stuart's regiment................................. 600

--- 1,000

-----

Total.................................................. 2,820