War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0715 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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you cannot return to-morrow (Wednesday night) you must report by couriers. You must not bring the hogs if it will seriously delay your command, but bring the cattle. It is important that your command should return as soon as possible.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

G. B. COSBY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,

Near Newbury, November 28, 1861.

Lieutenant-Colonel MACKALL,

Bowling Green, Ky.:

SIR: I occupy a position midway between Mill Springs and Burkesville for a day or two, to perfect my knowledge of the topography, resources, &c., of the country, before selecting a position for quarters in severe weather and as a basis of action in mild weather this winter.

Mill Springs, 22 miles east, is in a fertile region, with grist and saw mill, wood, water, and capable of easy defense, commanding the ferry. Geographically it is the best position on this side of the river for commanding the approaches to Cumberland Gap and Jacksborough. Burkesville or Creelsborough would better enable me to open the Cumberland and make secure our supply trains. During the winter, when the wagon roads are so bad, it would be far preferable to draw indispensable supplies direct from Nashville instead of Knoxville.

Brought to Gainesborough, between 40 and 50 miles from here, on boats, 50 or 60 miles of wagoning over bad roads would be saved between here and Knoxville. If the country north of the river between Burkesville and Gainesborough can be cleared of the enemy, they might subsequently be brought to the former place. Pork, corn, beef, hay, or fodder, horses, &c., are abundant and cheap here. I think the supply of flour will be good.

This will be handed to you by Major Alex. Wynn, who visits you to obtain General Johnston's assent to this arrangement, and, if obtained, to see the proper officers of the quartermaster and commissary departments at Nashville, and perfect the arrangements at as early a day as practicable.

Very respectfully,

F. K. ZOLLICOFFER,

Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I am not yet aware that Major-General Crittenden has assumed command in this district.

F. K. ZOLLICOFFER,

Brigadier-General.

CAMP NEAR POUND GAP, WISE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, November 28, 1861.

General A. SIDNEY JOHNSTON,

Bowling Green, Ky.:

GENERAL: When I was on my way to take command of this column I informed you by letter, with a request for such instructions as you might have to communicate. The President directed two regiments from Virginia and a battery of four pieces to report to me, and directed