War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0664 OPERATIONS IN KY.,TENN.,N. ALA.,AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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Our scouts have already been forward 18 miles and find no enemy. I have left the Fourteenth Kentucky at Paintville to guard stores and protect our communication with the Ohio.

The acting brigade quartermaster is greatly in need of funds. His requisitions were sent to headquarters several weeks ago, but he has not yet received a remittance.

Very respectfully,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

FEBRUARY 25, 1862-4 p. m.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville:

If it is true that the rebel shave bentonite Nashville and have fallen back on Murfreesborough to make a stand, it will be necessary to make our next movement with great caution. Give me the number of troops you can concentrate on Murfreesborough, independently of Halleck's troops. This is necessary, that I may be able to arrange that co-operation between Halleck's troops and your own that this absolutely necessary to insure ultimate succeeds. in this statement give number of guns and cavalry. By all mean take steps to hold Nashville securely. What have you from the Knoxville column? I hope soon to hear that it has reached the railroad. Can Garfield also reach the railroad? How long will it take you to be in front of Murfreesborough with all your available force?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

FEBRUARY 25, 1862-4 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis:

If it is true that the rebels have evacuated Nashville and intend fighting at Murfreesborough, our next movement must be made cautiously. Give me the number of your troops available on that line, independently of any of Buell's troops, stating number of guns and cavalry. Until I receive this statement I cannot decide whether we should turn Murfreesborough by line of Tennessee River or whether we can undertake that simultaneously with a movement to turn Columbus and seize Memphis.

For how long can we count upon the use of the Tennessee River for our gunboats?

I think our mortar boats, well protected by gunboats, should begin to annoy Columbus just as soon as we are ready to advance again. What information have you about Randolph or any other fortified points between Columbus and Memphis?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 25-8 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis:

I learn from telegraph of Commodore Foote to the Navy Department that you have ordered that no gunboats go above Nashville. I think