War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0660 OPERATIONS IN KY.,TENN.,N. ALA.,AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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position on the suburbs. During the day many persons called on me and professed that they always had been Union men; told who were rebels, &c.; mutually accused each other; and some informed me where Confederate provisions and clothing had been stored. The places were examined, and tons of slat pork wee found, flour, forage, &c., but not much clothing. The manufactory for small-arms and the material in the building were taken possession of.

In the evening we marched to a large spring near the Fair Grounds, east side of the city. Troops are crossing the river and taking position on the different roads. There are some good Union men, but many more rebels; not a few that were pressed into the rebel service, as they claim. Hard to believe all they say.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT, OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 24, 1862.

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

If it is thought that the present arrangement is best for the public service, I have nothing to say. I have done my duty in making the suggestions, and leave it to my superiors to adopt or reject them.

H. W . HALLECK,

Major-General.

LOUISVILLE, February 24, 1862-9 a. m.

Major General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Barren and Green Rivers very high. Boats up to Bowling Green this morning. Telegrams from Bowling Green, from which learn that General Buell has only General Mitchell's division with him.

McCook finds difficulty in crossing Barren River on account of the high water. Have no reliable news whatever from the enemy.

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

WASHINGTON, February 24, 1862-9.30 a. m.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL,

Louisville, Ky.:

I have requested halleck to give you all the aid in his power in your operations on Nashville. When we have gained that, where will enemy make his next stand? The possession of railway junctions near Chattanooga would seem to be of next importance. Decatur can probably best be taken by moving up Tennessee River. After we have gained Nashville and can see our way to holding Chattanooga we must get possession of Columbus and Memphis. Cannot Garfield reach the virginia and Tennessee Railway near Abingdon? We must not lose sight of Eastern Tennessee. Communicate frequently.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.