War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0653 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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BOWLING GREEN,

February 22, 1862.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER

United States Forces, Clarksville:

SIR: I am marching on Nashville. My advance will probable be within 9 miles of that place to night. You gunboats should move forward instantly. I believe they will meet no serious opposition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE,

February 22, 1862.

(Received February 23, 1862.

General THOMAS,

Bardstown:

Move for Louisville with your whole division, including the First Ohio Cavalry, now at Bardstown, by forced marches. Transports will be ready for you to embark for the Cumberland. Lose no time.

By command:

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

LOUISVILLE, February 22, 1862-1 p. m.

General BUELL,

Bowling Green:

Nothing new. Thomas' division will be at Bardstown to-morrow. Had he not better push on towards Green River? I have ordered jackson's cavalry and Behr's battery to march from Calhoun to Bowling Green. Jackson knows the country and will get forage. General McClellan is impatient, as you will see by his messages. I have telegraphed him twice, giving such information as I thought pertinent. Hope you won't go forward without letting me get down.

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, February 22, 1862.

General THOMAS,

Bardstown:

I am directed to urge you to use all possible dispatch in closing your division and preparing it for a rapid march.

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Camp near Bardstown, Ky., February 22, 1862.

Captain J. B. FRY,

Louisville, Ky.:

I am using every exertion to concentrate my division at this point. It rained two days ago as I never saw it rain before. It has done the same to-day. Nevertheless I hope all the regiments will reach here to-morrow, except, perhaps, Colonel Fry's Fourth Kentucky, which