War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0643 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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LOUISVILLE, February 20, 1862-12 p.m.

General BUELL, Bowling Green:

(To be forwarded by swift messenger.)

The following just received from General Halleck, viz:

We are in possession of Clarksville, in large force, with plenty of supplies. Move to that place rapidly by forced marches and effect a junction. Send all available to that place rapidly by forced marches and effect a junction. Send all available troops around that can reach there by water sooner than by land. Don't hesitate a moment. If you will come we are sure of Nashville and Columbus, and perhaps Memphis also. Answer yes or no.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Thomas had one regiment and one battery at Bardstown to-day. I have taken no action on General Halleck's message. General McClellan wanted you at Jeffersonville to-night at 10 o'clock, to talk.

JAMES B. FRY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., February 20, 1862

General HALLECK:

General Nelson's command has but ten days' supply of provisions. They will depend upon you, as none are sent from here to the Cumberland .

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 20, 1862

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War, Louisville, Ky.:

Have taken Clarksville, with large supplies. General Curtis has again defeated Price. Am short of steamboat transportation. Send steamers down the Ohio; also stores, if Buell moves on Clarksville. If he will not move I shall try to carry out my plans without him. Hesitation and delay are losing us the golden opportunity. Can't you assume the responsibility of ordering the move? See my dispatch to him of this evening.

H. W. HALLECK.

Major-General.

CAIRO, ILL., February 20, 1862

Brigadier General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding District West Tennessee:

I have received with the highest gratification your reports and letters from Fort Donelson, so gallantly captured under your brilliant leader-ship. I, in common with the whole country, warmly congratulate you upon this remarkable achievement, which has broken the enemy's center, dispersed the rebels, and given a death-blow to secession. The prisoners by thousands have arrived here, and will be sent off by to-morrow to their respective destinations.