War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0640 OPERATIONS IN KY.,TENN.,N. ALA.,AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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FEBRUARY 19, 1862-5 p.m.

General NELSON,

Commanding Division, Evansville:

Your orders to return here are countermanded. Proceed with your whole force to Paducah, and receive orders from General Halleck.

Intercept and take with you all troops that may have started back.

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

FEBRUARY 19, 1862

General THOMAS, Lebanon and Bardstown:

Stop the head of your column and let the rear close up at Bardstown, and halt there until further orders, but be ready to move again at a moment's notice.

Report definitely where your troops are.

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1862

General BUELL:

Halleck says Columbus re-enforced from New Orleans, and steam upon on their boats ready for move-probably on Cairo. Wishes to withdraw some troops from Donelson. I tell him improbable that rebels re-enforced from New Orleans or attack Cairo. Think [they] will abandon Columbus.

What force have you in Bowling Green, what in advance of it, and where to-day? How soon cay you be in front of Nashville, and in what force? What news of the rebels? If the force in West can take Nashville or even hold its own for the present, I hope to have Richmond and Norfolk in from three to four weeks. Answer.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN.

WASHINGTON, February 20, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK,

Dispatch of yesterday received. I doubt purpose of rebels to attack Cairo. More probably intend abandoning Columbus. Have too few troops at New Orleans to spare any.

This army moves very shortly. As soon as I hear from Buell will communicate again. Have sent all arms asked for new regiments in the West. Do not withdraw troops from Donelson until I hear from Buell to-day.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1862

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Buell has gone to Bowling Green. I will be in communication with him in a few minutes, and we will then arrange. The fall of Clarks-