War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0535 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 7, 1862.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

A gentleman called yesterday from Kentucky, stating he had been sent by one of your officers to ask more troops. How many more do you want and of what kind? We are exceedingly anxious to have some result in Kentucky, especially towards East Tennessee.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

LOUISVILLE, January -, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

No person has been sent ot ask for more troops. Undoubtedly there ought to be more, and better artillery and better cavalry, but I shall work with what I have, and as soon as possible. Concert of action, by which the enemy may be prevented from concentrating his whole force from Columbus to Bowling Green on one point of attack, would have the same and a better effect than more troops immediately here.

D. C. BUELL.

WASHINGTON, January 7, 1862.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Please name as early a day as you safely can on or before which you can be ready to move southward in concert with Major-General Halleck. Delay is ruining us, and it is indispensable for me to have something definite. I send a like dispatch to Major-General Halleck.

A. LINCOLN.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, January 7, 1862.-(midnight).

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President, Washington:

I have asked General Buell to designate a day for a demonstration to assist him. It is all I can do till I get arms. I have no arms. I have sent two unarmed regiments to assist in the feint. I wrote you yesterday and will again to-night.*

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE,

Columbia, Ky., January 7, 1862.

General THOMAS:

SIR: A rebel steamboat passed Burkesville yesterday at 12 o'clock, loaded with men and cannon and other arms, clothing, &c.

I send 300 cavalry to heights on this side to intercept it, if possible. I will move with 300 of Third Kentucky and the Nineteenth Ohio to an advantageous position at the mouth of Renick' Creek, 2 1/2 miles above Burkesville, on the Cumberland. I shall move that the whole force here to Burkesville. It is only 4 miles farther from Glasgow than Columbia. I am not willing to see the Cumberland surrendered, without a struggle, to Zollicoffer and the rebel invaders. If this movement is wrong, it can

---------------

* Letter not found.

---------------