War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0527 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION .

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Springs unless he is crowded, in which case he will probably recross the river. At present, however, it appears evident that he is preparing fora winter quarters where he is. Your movement change his plans. I am credibly informed that Buckner sent to him very recently complied with, Zollicoofer declining to move in that direction either in whole or in part.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF,

Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

January 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, U. S. A., Louisville, Ky.:

It is represented that the citizens of Union and Crittenden Counties, Kentucky, suffer much from depredations by rebels, and need protection. What do you think of sending two unemployed regiments from Illinois under your orders to be used for their protection? Answer soon.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, January 2, 1862.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have had no instructions respecting co-operation. All my available troops are in the field except those at Cairo and Paducah, which are barely sufficient to threaten Columbus, &c. A few weeks hence I hope to be able to render you very material assistant,but now a withdrawal of my troops this State is almost impossible. Write me fully.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

PADUCAN, KY., January 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM:

A reconnaissance to within a few miles of Camp Beauregard shows that the troops that left for Bowling Gren have been replaced by two-months' men from Mississippi. Pilow's division ordered to Bowling Green, but returned, and go in winter quarters.

C. F. SMITH.

[Repeated by General Cullum to General to General Buell january 3.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, January 3, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: It is of the greatest importance that the rebel troops in Western Kentucky be prevented from moving to the support of the force in front of General Buell. To accomplish this an expedition should be sent up the Cumberland River, to act in concert with General Buell's command, of sufficient strength to defeat any force that may be brought