War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0519 Chapter XVII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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under this order will be taxed 50 per cent. more than Southern men of their class and means.

The refugees at Cave in Rock will be invited and means of transportation provided to Smithland or Paducah.

These contributions will be collected as far out as the military arm can securely extend, and at these distant points will be assessed and collected without the intervening of time between assessment and collection.

Commanding officers at Paducah, Ky., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., are particularly charged with the execution of this order.

By order of Brigadier General U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

LEBANON, KY., December 28, 1861.

Brigadier General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.;

Colonel Bramlette writes at 7[9] p. m. last evening confirming his report of yesterday, that the enemy are at Jamestown, about 3,000 strong. Shall I move down to Columbia to Bramlette's aid? One brigade might be moved and let supplies follow.

GEO H. THOMAS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

LOUISVILLE, December 28, 1861.

(Received Lebanon, December 28, 1861.)

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

Yes, go on, not to his aid, but to the object we discussed; that is what I want done, and to be entirely successful it must be conducted with secrecy and without any tarrying on the road.

Order supplies to be purchased there as well as sent.

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General.

CAMP BOYLE, December 28, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

The pickets sent out bring in the news that the rebels have fallen back from Jamestown 7 miles, having been frightened by the picket fight at Jamestown, by the impression that the forces here were hear Jamestown and in front of their movement.

They will now most likely recross to the south side of the river at Mill Springs, being in 7 miles of that crossing, which is in their possession. The are evidently greatly disturbed by their position, and I think it very probable will now retire, by the same route they came into Kentucky. That thy are retreating or about to don so I am well satisfied from the accounts I get of their recent acts in Clinton. They are now seizing everything they can carry off. The inhabitants are fleeing from before their marauding parties, that devastate as they go. This is an evidence of their retiring, being the course pursued by them as they leave. The forces that were at Jamestown are the same that composed the advance guard when they first invaded Kentucky, viz, Stanton and Murray's regiments, with the addition of McRea's regiment of cavalry