War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0404 OPERATION IN KY., TENN., N. ALA., AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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of the enemy at that period. It is, however, known that the enemy's force was largely in excess of that General Johnston.

3. What prevented General Johnston at that time from making a forward movement towards the Ohio River? Was the restrained by instructions from the War department or was he left to his own discretion in the matter?

The cause which prevented General Johnston from making a forward movement at that time towards the Ohio River was thus stated by him in a letter of October 22, 1861: "We have received but little accession to our ranks since the Confederate forces crossed the line; in fact, no such enthusiastic demonstration as to justify any movements not warranted by our ability to maintain our own communications." General Johnston was left to his own discretion in all his military movements, and was never at any time restrained by instructions from the War Department from moving his forces in any manner he deemed advisable.

4. What forces, if any, were sent from Bowling Green to Fort Donelson previous to the first battle at that place and under whose command?

5. What number of forces did General Johnston retain at Bowling Green up to the time of its evacuation?

6. Did General Johnston re-enforce or attempt to re-enforce the Confederate army at Fort Donelson during the progress of the conflicts at that place?

To these inquiries the only information that can be given must necessarily be derived from the official report of General Johnston, which has been called for but not yet received at the department. It will be submitted as soon as received.

7. Is it within the knowledge of the War department that any applications were made by the commanders of our forces at Fort Donelson during the progress of the conflicts at that place?

It is now known to the department, through the reports of Generals Floyd and re-enforcements were made.

8. Was Department Johnston restrained by orders from the War Department from sending re-enforcements or was he left to his own discretion in that regard?

No orders on the subject were issued from the department. General Johnston's discretion on the subject was unrestrained.

9. What means of transportation had General Johnston at Bowling Green to enable him to re-enforce Fort Donelson during the contests, had been disposed to do so?

10. When were the fortifications at Forts Donelson and Henry constructed and in what mode?

11. Was there any military reconnaissance along the banks of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, with the view to judicious selections of places for fortifications, before the sites for Forts Henry and Donelson were selected?

On these subject nothing is recorded in the books of the War Department.

12. Did General Johnston fall back from Bowling Green in accordance with instructions from the War Department or was he left to his own discretion in the matter?

General Johnston received no instructions from the War Department on this subject. He acted on this, as on all other questions of military movements and operations, in accordance with his own judgment. He counseled with Generals Beauregard and Hardee before withdrawing from Bowling Green.

13. Why was Nashville surrendered to the enemy?

14. Did General Johnston proceed upon his own discretion, or under