War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0355 Chapter XVII. CAPTURE OF FORT DONELSON, TENN.

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C, shot and killed instantly on the field, fell covered with glory, in the gallant discharge of his duties, as did the other lamented dead and wounded of my regiment.

With a very grateful recollection of my whole command, for their soldierly and manly demeanor throughout our whole campaign, I cannot close this report without submitting with it acknowledgments for valuable services and kind offices done me by Lieuts. Nath. Gooch, of Company C, and John M. Douglass, of Company G, who are also very justly entitled to all I have heretofore stated on behalf of other officers.

Owing to the sudden and unexpected separation from my company officers I am unable to submit with this report the names of the killed and wounded of my regiment, and can therefore only state them in the aggregate:

There were killed on the field..................... 4

Mortally wounded................................... 6

Supposed not mortally.............................. 38

Missing............................................ 4

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Total.............................................. 52

The foregoing report of the conduct and action of my regiment and of its casualties at Fort Donelson I have on this day the honor to submit to you.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH B. PALMER,

Colonel, Commanding Eighteenth Tennessee Regiment.

Colonel JOHN C. BROWN,

Commanding 3rd Brigadier, 2nd Div., Cent. Army of Kentucky, C. S. Army.

Numbers 61. Report of Colonel Edward C. Cook, Thirty-second Tennessee Infantry.

FORT DONELSON, STEWART COUNTY, TENN.,

February 16, 1862.

The Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment reached Fort Donelson on the night of the 10th instant, with 555 men, rank and file, many of the regiment having been left sick at Russellville, Ky., many at Bowling Green, Ky., and some on furlough, sick at home. We were placed on the left of General Buckner's division. The entire regiment was employed making entrenchments till the same were finished. The enemy began to fire upon us with artillery and sharpshooters as early as Tuesday evening, the 11th.

The weather was extremely cold, and being kept continually at labor and on duty, we suffered much from exposure. The regiment, although held in readiness at every moment, was not engaged in actual fight until Saturday, the 15th.

On Friday night we were ordered to have cooked rations for three days, and, with knapsacks packed, to be ready to march at 4 o'clock the next morning. I then learned that it had been determined by the generals in council at that hour to march to the extreme left of our entrenchments, attack the enemy's right wing and turn it, and, if we succeeded, to march for Nashville.