War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0309 Chapter XVII. CAPTURE OF FORT DONELSON, TENN.

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[Indorsement Numbers 1.]

Considering Brigadier-General Pillow as still belonging to this command, his appeal to the Department for an official investigation is ap proved, as due to himself and the Government.

BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT WEST,

Tupelo, 22nd June, 1862.

[Indorsement Numbers 2.]

Respectfully submitted to the President. I think ti will be well for me to inform General Pillow that negotiations are going on for a general exchange of prisoners, which will probably release Genera Buckner and the rest of the Donelson prisoners at an early day and render an investigation practicable, which cannot be entered upon now with justice to them.

G. W. RANDOPLH,

Secretary of War.

[Indorsement Numbers 3.]

Answer as proposed, and correct the impression that the action is a reflection on him specially. The effort at a full investigation has failed from causes for which the Government is not responsible and regrets.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, July 5, 1862.

Brigadier General GIDEON J. PILLOW, Tupelo, Miss.:

GENERAL: Your communication of the 21st ultimo having been considered by the President, I am instructed to inform you that your suspension has never been considered an accusation, but as preliminary to an investigation which the circumstances of the Fort Donelson affair rendered necessary. The President regrets that the detention of the Fort Donelson prisoners renders such investigation impossible at present, but as this detention could not be foreseen, but, on the contrary, was in violation of an agreement made with General Wool for an exchange of prisoners, neither the President nor the War Department is responsible for the delay which has occurred.

General Woof has again announced his readiness to agree to a general exchange, and negotiations are about to be commenced which no doubt will lead to that result. So soon as the actors in the Fort Donelson surrender are at liberty the matter will receive through investigation and justice be done. I am quite sure, general, that you desire nothing else, and I very much regret that the Department could not, with due regard to the absent parties, order an investigation which necessarily implicates them.

Very respectfully,

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.