War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0256 OPERATIONS IN KY., TENN., N.ALA., AND S.W.VA. Chapter XVII.

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captured. Our own loss amounted to about 500 killed and wounded. They have a force of forty-two regiments.

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General.

A. S. JOHNSTON.

NASHVILLE, TENN., February 16, 1862.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN,:

The following dispatch was received at 3.45 o'clock this morning:

FORT DONELSON, TENN., February 16, 1862.

General A. SIDNEY JOHNSTON:

Last evening there arrived in the river near Fort Donelson eleven transports, laden with troops. We are completely invested with an army many times our own numbers. I regret to say the unanimous opinion seems to be that we cannot maintain ourselves against these forces.

JOHN. B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General.

A. S. JOHNSTON.

NASHVILLE, TENN., February 17, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

Fort Donelson was surrendered at 4.10 p. m. yesterday, after most gallant defense. Floyd saved about 1,000 men. He and Pillow are here. Buckner surrendered after they left. This army is across the Cumberland.

A. S. JOHNSTON,

General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, March 11, 1862.

General A. SIDNEY JOHNSTON,

Decatur, Ala.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your dispatches through Major Liddell. The reports of Brigadier-Generals Floyd and Pillow are unsatisfactory, and the President directs that both these generals be relieved from command till further orders. In the mean time you will request them to add to their reports such statements as they may deem proper on the following points:

1st. The failure to give timely notice of the insufficiency of the garrison of Fort Donelson to repel attack.

2nd. The failure of any attempt to save the army by evacuating he post when found to be untenable.

3rd. Why they abandoned the command to their inferior officer, instead of executing themselves whatever measure was deemed proper for the entire army.

4th. What was the precise mode by which each effected his escape from the fort and what dangers were encountered in the retreat.

5th. Upon what the precise mode by which each effected his escape from the fort and what dangers were encountered in the retreat.

5th. Upon what principle a selection was made of particular troops, being certain regiments of the senior general's brigade, to whose use all the transportation on hand was appointed.

6th. A particular designation of the regiments saved and the regiments abandoned which formed part of the senior general's brigade.