War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0161 Chapter XVII. CAPTURE OF FORT DONELSON, TENN.

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quest information of the point where future communications will reach him. Also inform him that my headquarters will be for the present in Dover.

S. B. BUCKNER,

Brigadier-General.

Have the white flag hoisted on Fort Donelson, not on the batteries.

S. B. BUCKNER,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD,

Camp near Fort Donelson, February 16, 1862.

SIR: Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General S. B. BUCKNER,

Confederate Army.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

HEADQUARTERS,

Dover, Tenn., February 16, 1862.

SIR: The distribution of the forces under my command incident to an unexpected change of commanders and the overwhelming force under your command compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success of the Confederate army yesterday, to accept the ungenerous an unchivalrous terms which you propose.

I am, sir, your very obedient servant,

S. B. BUCKNER,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

Brigadier General U. S. GRANT, U. S. A.

Numbers 2. Report of Lieutenant Colonel James B. McPherson, U. S. Army, Chief Engineer.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., February 25, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of operations relating to the capture of Fort Donelson

From the capture of Fort Henry, on the 6th instant, until the 12th, the time was chiefly occupied in making reconnaissances up the Tennessee River to a short distance above Danville and of the roads leading to Fort Donelson, getting our forces in condition to march against the latter place and awaiting the co-operation of the gunboats. The reconnaissance toward Fort Donelson made known the fact that there were two very good roads connecting the two forts, one the direct road, distance about 12 miles, and the other bearing off to the southeast for some distance, soon after leaving Fort Henry, and then continuing essentially parallel to the former, distance about 14 miles. The heaviest part of the whole route was from the Tennessee River at Fort Henry back 2 miles

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