War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0121 Chapter XVII. CAPTURE OF FORT HENRY, TENN.

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CAIRO, January 28, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis, Mo.

With permission, I will take Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and establish and hold a large camp there.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 29, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis, Mo.

In view of the large force now concentrating in this district and the present feasibility of the plan I would respectfully suggest the propriety of subduing Fort Henry, near the Kentucky and Tennessee line, and holding the position. If this is not done soon there is but little doubt but that the defenses on both the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers will be materially strengthened. From Fort Henry it will be easy to operate either on the Cumberland, only 12 miles distant, Memphis, or Columbus. It will, besides, have a moral effect upon our troops to advance them toward the rebel States. The advantages of this move are as perceptible to the general commanding as to myself, therefore further statements are unnecessary.

U. S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, January 30, 1862.

Brigadier General U. S. GRANT,

Cairo, Ill.

Make your preparations to take and hold Fort Henry. I will send you written instructions by mail.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 30, 1862.

Brigadier General U. S. GRANT,

Cairo, Ill.

SIR: You will immediately prepare to send forward to Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, all your available forces from Smithland, Paducah, Cairo, Fort Holt, Bird's Point, &c. Sufficient garrisons must be left to hold these places against an attack from Columbus. As the roads are almost impassable for large forces, and as your command is very deficient in transportation, the troops will be taken in steamers up the Tennessee River as far as practicable. Supplies will also be taken up in steamers as far as possible. Flag-Officer Foote will protect the transports with his gunboats. The Benton and perhaps some others should be left for the defense of Cairo. Fort Henry should be taken and held at all hazards. I shall immediately send you three additional companies of artillery from this place.

The river front of the fort is armed with 20-pounders, and it may be necessary for you to take some guns of large caliber and establish a bat-