War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0077 Chapter XVII. LOGAN'S CROSS-ROADS, KY.

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were Colonel McCook, of the Ninth Ohio, commanding brigade, and his aide, Lieutenant Burt, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry. The loss of the rebels was Zollicoffer and 114 others killed and buried, 116 prisoners not wounded, 5 of whom are surgeons, and Lieutenant-Colonel Carter, Twentieth Tennessee Regiment.

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Louisville, Ky., February 9, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit General Thomas' report of the battle of Mill Springs, and to commend the services of his troops to the approbation of the General-in-Chief for their fortitude under discomforts and difficulties and their gallantry in battle. The question of rewards to meritorious persons will naturally present itself in this connection. It is one which will require to be treated with very great caution. It is one which produces jealousies and dissatisfaction in a regular army, and, composed as ours is, may lead to a most injurious condition of things. I would suggest that rewards for services in battle be conferred exclusively by bravest, leaving the full promotion (to the grade of brigadier) to flow exclusively from fitness for the office as shown by service. The advantage of this rule, in fact the necessity for it, is, I think, obvious.

I commend the general in command for the fidelity and ability with which he executed my instructions.

I would call attention to the following brigade and regimental commanders who were actively engaged in the battleColonel R. L. McCook, Ninth Ohio, commanded the Third Brigade. He was distinguished for efficiency and gallantry on the field, and, though severely wounded early in the action, continued in h is command until the engagement closed.

Colonel M. D. Manson, Tenth Indiana, commanded the Second Brigade, and behaved gallantly on the field.

Colonel S. S. Fry commanded the Fourth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, was wounded, and was distinguished for gallantry and efficiency on the field.

Colonel Van Cleve commanded the Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteers, and was distinguished for gallantry and efficiency on the field.

Lieutenant-Colonel Kise commended the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and was distinguished for gallantry and efficiency on the field.

Major Kammerling commanded the Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, and was distinguished for gallantry and efficiency on the field.

For the part taken in the action by the different regiments and batteries and the subordinate officers I would refer to the report of General Thomas and the officers in command under him.

No other reports in relation to the battle have been received.

A box of captured flags will be forwarded by express.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.