War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0074 OPERATIONS IN KY., TENN., N. ALA., AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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reached the south point of the island, next to Fort Henry, we could see two rebel steamers depart in great haste. We shelled Fort Henry, and the fort returned our fire with one shot, which must have been a 32-pounder rifled gun. The north side of the fort is a cremaillere line, mounting four 32-pounders. The three other sides are rectangular, mounting two 64 and two 24 pounders. In front cremaillere line is, I should judge, a redan commenced. South of the fort is a large camp. East of the fort is one regiment encamped. From Fort Henry to Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River, 12 miles; connected by a good road. On the west side of the Tennessee River, opposite the fort, two hills, about 90 feet above river. Fort Henry is strongly built, and I believe well garrisoned. All around the fort abatis, from head of island to the fort, two miles and a half.

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Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN RZIHA,

Captain, Nineteenth Infantry, U. S. Army.

Numbers 2. Reports of Brigadier General Lloyd Tilghman, C. S. Army.

FORT DONELSON, January 18, 1862-8 a.m.

All quiet this morning; 2,000 infantry and 200 cavalry have landed at Eggner's Ferry and encamped 6 miles out on road to Murray. Have 15 wagons. Their object, I think, is our railroad at Paris.

Gunboats below us have retired again, with transports. All quiet at Dover.

TILGHMAN.

General POLK.

FORT DONELSON, January 18, 1862-11 p.m.

A second courier from Henry, 4 o'clock, brings further particulars of enemy's position. About same. Will try and destroy Wood's Creek Bridge; it will impede them. I shall draw 600 men from here. Everything quiet here. Am destroying ferry-boats below. Ten-inch gun mounted at Henry at 4 p.m.; another, 32, will be by 12 m. Shall return to Henry at 3 a.m. and lose no time.

TILGHMAN.

General POLK.

FORT HENRY, January 19, 1862.

[C. F.] Smith is at Murray with, I thin, 7,500 men, including 1,000 cavalry and twelve field pieces. I have possession of the hill and am fortifying hard. Can make it strong, if time is allowed. One Alabama company of cavalry came to-night; send back boat for the others. Have moved 600 men and three pieces field artillery from Donelson here. Await anxiously to know about re-enforcements. I must and will hold the hill, if I can. Men behave well.

LLOYD TILGHMAN,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army, Commanding.

Colonel W. W. MACKALL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Bowling Green, Ky.