War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0073 Chapter XVII. RECONNAISSANCE TO FORT HENRY, TENN.

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erence to the future. I know nothing about the course of operations to be pursued, but if Union City (which I have always thought to be a strong strategic point) is to be occupied, the most feasible means of supplying our troops there at this period of the year is from here by rail to the State line. Place good engines and wood cars on our road, repair the road as we go, and guard the whole line with a strong force. The distance from the end of the railway to the Columbus road is but 8 miles to be marched, or we can march the 35 miles to Union City from the terminus of the road. I speak of this on account of the extreme difficulty of sending wagon trains for a large force at this period of the year.

I send herewith a rather meager infantry of the march.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

The ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters District of Cairo, Cairo, Ill.

HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES,

Paducah, Ky., January 28, 1862.

SIR: I transmit herewith an itinerary of the recent march of this command, which ought to have accompanied my report of yesterday. I spoke of the march from Fulton-the terminus of the railway from this place to the State line-to Union City as 35 miles. It is only 11 miles. From Fulton to the Mobile and Ohio railway by the State line is 8 miles. It is the same distance from Fulton to the Nashville and Northwestern Railway.

See accompanying sketch.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

The ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters District of Cairo, Cairo, Ill.

[Inclosure.]

Journal of the march of the First and Second Brigades of the United States forces from Paducah, Ky., to Callaway, on the Tennessee River, and back.

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January 21.-Road towards Callaway bad; Callaway-a small place of three or four houses and one mill, not running now-has got a poor landing place. We found here the gunboat Lexington and the steamer Wilson, with forage and provision. The gunboat Lexington went up river towards Fort Henry; chased a small rebel gunboat with two 12-pounder rifled guns, but the rebel escaped; then threw twelve shells into Fort Henry. During the night, frost. Four miles north is Aurora, a small place, with a landing and ferry on the Tennessee River.

January 22.-Brigadier-general commanding, C. F. Smith, Brigade Surgeon Dr. Hewitt, and Captain John Rziha went up the river on the gunboat Lexington to reconnoiter Fort Henry. When our gunboat

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*Omitted as unimportant.

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