War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0048 OPERATIONS IN KY.,TENN.,N. ALA.,AND S. W. VA. Chapter XVII.

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I submit herewith Colonel Moore's report, and will send others as soon as the offices make them out. They have been called for, but are not yet prepared. I send Dr. Duke's report of casualties. I think our loss will amount to 11 killed and 15 wounded; not more.* the loss of the enemy was very severe. I understand he will report 1 killed and 10 or 12 wounded; his usual practice. We suppose his loss to be over 250 killed and about 300 wounded. These are the estimates of the neighbors. we saw his dead borne in numbers from the fires, and the embarkation of his wounded was attested by several, who place these estimates upon the number. The field itself bears unerring testimony to his severe loss.

I can only say to you, general, that my troops acted firmly and enthusiastically during the whole fight; and, though the enemy numbered some 5,000 to our 1,500, they were certainly well whipped. If I had had bread for my men (some of whom had had nothing to eat for thirty hours) I should have renewed the action after night; but an enemy greater than the Lincolnites (starvation) summoned me to reach a point where we might obtain food for man and horse.

I pursued next day my march to this place, distant from the scene of action some 16 miles, which I accomplished in three days. My scouts informed me the enemy was at the same time returning to the points on the Sandy whence he came to disperse the "rebel force" I have the honor to command.

This is the first mill where I could get bread. I halted here and pitched my camp, perfectly satisfied that unless the enemy shall be strongly re-enforced he will not seek to renew our acquaintance.

In closing this account of my condition here I must let you know that this service cannot be advantageous to the Confederacy as it is now established. My force should be much greater or it should be withdrawn from this frontier altogether. Referring to the map, you will perceive that the Sandy river traverses from Piketon to its mouth about 100 miles, all of which is navigable by small steamers at high stages of water, and is navigable to Louisa at nearly all stages of water, and nearly at all seasons of the year. Emptying into the Ohio directly in front of the rich valley of the Scioto, and with a direct connection with the Ohio River navigation, the line of the Sandy as a military line demands a corps d'armee, simply because you must have a force sufficient to hold the point of its confluence with the Ohio, or your adversary can use the water transportation for his troops and land them in a few miles of your position fresh and ready for action. So he can in a night re-enforce them until he had a number sufficient to assure his success. I have found this objection to the line, and it has therefore been one of my purposes to draw away from the Sandy River and to compel him to use transportation for his troops and land them in a few miles of your position fresh and ready for action. So he can in a night re-enforce them until he has a number sufficient to assure his success. I have found this objection to the line, and it has therefore been one of my purposes to draw away from the Sandy River and to compel him to use transportation by land and to march his troops over the same kind of roads I travel. this has a tendency to bring up upon a platform of equality.

But, sir, this country will not furnish subsistence for even the troops I now have; therefore we must advance or we must retire. The snow is now upon the ground and the roads nearly impassable. Indeed, the roads are made through very narrow valleys - the water-courses - and frequently these water-courses are so swollen as no to be fordable, yet they cannot be avoided without traversing high and steep mountains, now covered with ice and inaccessible for horses.

My troops now subsist by going to the fields, shucking the corn,

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*The nominal list shows 9 killed and 14 wounded.

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