War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0039 Chapter XVII. EASTERN KENTUCKY.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE,

Mouth of Muddy Branch, January 6, 1862.

Major McLAUGHLIN,

Commanding Squadron Cavalry

DEAR SIR: Information has just been received that the enemy has broken up his camp and retreated precipitately. It is of the utmost importance that we know the truth of this report, and, if true, that we know the direction he has taken. You will therefore send forthwith a part of your command, under a discreet officer, who shall proceed to Jennie's Creek and learn whether the enemy is still there, and, if so, whether he has been re-enforced. If he has left, try to discover the route he has taken. I leave the number subject to your discretion, but would suggest 40 or 50. I shall expect a report from you at an early hour in the morning. A messenger from George's Creek tells me that Colonel Bolles will not reach you till to-morrow noon.

Very truly, yours,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE,

Camp Buell, January 24, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel J. BROWN,

Fourteenth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers

SIR: You are ordered to take command of a detachment of 130 men, with a complement of company officers, and start to-morrow morning, at as early an hour as practicable, to the cliffs of Little Sandy. The object of your expedition is to capture or disperse a body of the enemy who are occupying that vicinity and are committing depredations upon the property of citizens. If in your judgment the success of your enterprise demands it, you are authorized to detach a commissioned officer and a squad o men to guard such passes as the enemy would be likely to escape through.

You are hereby empowered to arrest and bring to these headquarters all persons who are aiding or abetting the rebellion, and who in your judgment are dangerous to the Union cause. I have ordered the quartermaster of the Fourteenth Kentucky to send with you a commissary sergeant, who will provide by purchase such provisions as the forces under your command are entitled to by law, but are unable to take with them. Your command will take three days' cooked rations in their haversacks, and will carry nothing in their knapsacks but their blankets. Each man must have 30 rounds of ammunition.

I shall expect you to return at the end of five days. If the success of your expedition requires it, you are authorized to extend the time to six days, but no longer, without orders from me.

Very truly, yours,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.