War of the Rebellion: Serial 007 Page 0021 Chapter XVII. EASTERN KENTUCKY.

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The general commanding returns his thanks to Brigadier-General Hindman and his command for their conduct in the initiative of the campaign in Kentucky, and he hails the brilliant courage shown in the affair as a bright augury of their valor when the actual hour comes for striking a decisive blow.

By order of Major-General Hardee

D. G. WHITE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

DECEMBER 23, 1861 - JANUARY 30, 1862. - Garfield's and Marshall's operations in Eastern Kentucky.

EVENTS.

December 23, 1861. - Union forces advance from Louisa.

Jan. 7, 1861. - Skirmish at Jennie's Creek.

10, 1862. - Engagement at Middle Creek, near Prestonburg.

24-30, 1862. - expeditions to the Little Sandy and Piketon.

REPORTS, ETX.

Numbers 1. - Brigadier General Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio, with instructions to Colonel Garfield, and congratulatory orders.

Numbers 2. - Colonel James A. Garfield, Forty-second Ohio Infantry, commanding brigade, with instructions to subordinates.

Numbers 3. - Brigadier General Humphrey Marshall, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, with instructions from War Department.

Numbers 4. - Colonel A. C. Moore, Twenty-ninth Virginia Infantry.

Numbers 1. Report of Brigadier General Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, commanding Department of the Ohio, with instructions to Colonel Garfield, and congratulatory orders.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Louisville, January 14, 1862.

Colonel Garfield, commanding Eighteenth Brigade, reports that on the 7th instant he attacked and drove the enemy from his entrenchments at Paintsville, killing 3 and wounding several; our loss 2 killed and 1 wounded. On the 10th he attacked the main body of the enemy, under Humphrey Marshall, posted on the hills at the Forks of Middle Creek. Skirmishing commenced at 8 a. m.; engaged from 1 p. m. until dark. The enemy was driven from all his positions, and in the night burned most of his stores and fled precipitately. Our force was 1,800 infantry and 300 cavalry. The enemy had 2,500 infantry, three pieces of artillery, and six companies of cavalry. Our loss at Prestonburg, 2 killed, 25 wounded. The enemy's loss at Prestonburg, 27 found dead on the field. He carried off his wounded and many of his killed.

We took 25 prisoners, 10 horses, and a quantity of stores.

Colonel Garfield had crossed the Big Sandy to Prestonburg on the 11th.

D. C. BUELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General, Washington.