War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0886 OPERATIONS IN W.FLA., S.ALA., S.MISS., AND LA. Chapter XV.

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RICHMOND, VA., May 5, 1862.

Governor MOORE,

Camp Moore, La.:

Notice that you were going to Monroe caused my failure to reply to your former dispatch. With regret I afterwards learned that the enemy had occupied New Orleans. Concur with you as to the changes necessary because of that event. I had previously concluded to form a department west of the Mississippi. It is not a necessity, but we must further delay action, because the troops and higher officers are concentrated for a battle in Tennessee.

My present opinion is that it will be better to have one of your camps on each side of the river.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

(Repeated May 7.)

MONTGOMERY, May 5, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War:

Have furnished General Forney with all the arms I have. If he can get 500 of those at Charleston, brought by Nashville and Cecilia, he believes he can defend Mobile successfully. Its fall involves the arsenal at Mount Vernon, perhaps this place, and cuts off communication with Corinth. Shall send immediately an agent to Charleston to bring them, and most earnestly urge they be supplied. Alabama, in addition to turning over 21,000 stand taken at Mount Vernon, has armed over 18,000 troops now in other States. She asks but for 500.

JNO. GILL SHORTER,

Governor of Alabama.

[Indorsement.]

I have only heard of 3,000 arms having been brought to Charleston by the Cecilia; 2,000 were ordered to General Pemberton for Georgia troops and 1,000 to Chattanooga for the Alabama troops.

So far as I know there are no arms in Charleston.

R. E. LEE.

RICHMOND, VA., May 5, 1862.

General JOHN H. FORNEY,

Mobile:

Governor Shorter suggests that in case of an attack upon Mobile the prisoners at Montgomery should be removed to Columbus or Macon, Ga. As you may be too much occupied in case of attack to attend to their removal, I have requested the governor to advise with and assist you in the matter. You had better communicate with him.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, VA., May 6, 1862.

Colonel THOMAS M. JONES,

Commanding at Pensacola:

In case you have to evacuate Pensacola, destroy cotton, tobacco, and military and naval stores, but avoid the destruction of buildings and