War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0831 Chapter XVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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standing. I have deputed him as a special messenger to place in your hands a memorial from the Executive Sub-committee of a Committee of Safety appointed by the city council to render such aid as it may be able to the State and Confederate authorities in this department. I refer you to the memorial itself for its design and to Mr. Henderson for any explanations you may desire not embodied in the memorial.

I cannot suppose that your excellency has been fully apprised of the evils which the memorial presents to your attention and consideration, and I most earnestly recommend it to you. Your excellency will no doubt appreciate the necessity for or immediate action to preserve not only the dignity and credit of the Navy Department, but also to provide such defenses as we are in absolute and immediate need of.

Citizens as well as the incorporated banks of the city are generous in their support of the Government, and I have no fears that this generosity will be abused.

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

THO. O. MOORE,

Governor of Louisiana.

[Inclosure.]

NEW ORLEANS, LA., February 26, 1862.

To the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

SIR: In the present disturbed condition of our country it has been deemed expedient by our city council to appoint a committee of some sixty persons, to be styled the Committee of Safety.

The object of said committee is to aid and co-operate with the State and Government authorities in rendering this department as complete and effectual as possible. The committee is composed of gentlemen of standing and influence, and who have appointed the undersigned their executive committee, and who are not insensible of the labors and responsibilities placed upon them. They feel that your excellency will not be offended at their desire to co-operate with the constitutional authorities in this our struggle for liberty and independence.

They find, from investigation, that the naval department at this station, as far as finances are concerned, is in a most deplorable condition, retarding by this course manufactures of all kinds for that department; also preventing the enlisting of men for that branch of the public service.

The undersigned committee have been led to believe that your excellency could not be aware of the extent to which the naval department at this station has been reduced.

They therefore beg leave respectfully to represent some of the bad effects which will naturally and certainly follow in case this defect is not promptly remedied, by placing an adequate amount of funds at the disposal of that department to liquidate its present indebtedness and provide for future contingencies.

The present outstanding indebtedness, judging from facts placed before this committee, cannot be less than $600,000 or $ 800,000. A large portion of this is owing to the foundries, for shells, fuses, &c., to the machine-shops, draymen, &c. Many of the bills have been approved by the proper officers, and still no means provided for their payment, although some of them have stood over for four or six months. It has come to the positive knowledge of this committee that some of these establishments (so much needed in the present emergency) have given