War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0799 Chapter XVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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ous points along the coast had I not kept in view hour expressed wish that all clashing, even in appearance, should be avoided between the two arms of service. I have now on Lake Borgne a larger armed force than the Navy has, but it is kept up under the name of supplying our posts on the sound, it being necessary that the vessels should be armed for their own protection. I hope that, in connection with Mr. Mallory, you may be able to devise some plan by which either the entire mater may be placed under my control or the naval officer in command may have orders to afford such aid as I may officially require of him. The therefore have some power to say what should be done.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 1, New Orleans, La., January 8, 1862.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Some six weeks since, at the urgent call of an officer in kentucky, and believing that I would be safe from attack until January, I sent two regiments to Columbus, with the distinct understanding on my part, and so expressed both to Generals Johnston and Polk, that when the enemy appeared here they should be returned. General Polk now, in answer to my call, telegraphs me that he has asked you to send me other troops, and you have consented. I hope that this is not so. The troops I sent him are natives of this part of the country and cannot be replaced by other troops, and you have consented. I hope that this is not so. The troops I sent him are natives of this part of the country and cannot be replaced by others. The Third Mississippi Regiment is composed largely of the fishermen, oystermen, and sailors of Louis Bay, Biloxi, Ocean Springs, &c., and are well acquainted with all the inlets, bayous, and sounding of that intricate and difficult coast, and can be of more service there than any other body of men. I have therefore written to General Polk to insist the the Third Mississippi Regiment, at all events, shall be sent down. They can sa well be replaced there as here by fresh troops, but none can supply their place to me on the Mississippi coast. The regiment was raised particularly for that service, about half of it being amphibious, and I shall want to put a number of them in boats. The country troops will not answer my purpose. I beg, therefore, that even if you permit General Polk to retain the Thirteenth Louisiana you will telegraph him to send me the Third Mississippi Regiment immediately. He does me great injustice by leaving me until this late hour under the impression that when I wanted these two regiments they should be returned, and I have so written him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General Commanding.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, January 9, 18652.

Honorable J. B. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, inclosing two communications from General Bragg.