War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0723 Chapter XVI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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2. Lieutenant Colonel C. M. Whelden, Thirty-first Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers.

4. Major F. A. Boardman, Fourth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers.

5. Cap. Peter Haggerty, aide-de-camp.

Major J. M. Bell, volunteer aide-de-camp, recorder and legal adviser. By command of Major-General Butler:

GEO. C. STRONG,

Acting Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, May 8, 1862.

WM. H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State:

MY DEAR SIR: I write this note simply as a remembrance of your kindness and support to the expedition which has accomplished such fortunate results.

I find that the British consul here has complicated himself and his fellow-countrymen with the rebels in every form. The precise contrary course, I believe, has been taken by the French consul. The British Guard, now all claiming protection as British subjects, having organized themselves into a company on the right of the occupation of the city by our troops, voted to send their arms and uniforms to Beauregard, and a portion of them were sent.

For this violation of neutrality I have ordered every man who cannot produce his arms and uniform to leave the city in twenty-four hours.

Allow me to suggest for your consideration whether the port of New Orleans might now be opened.

Most truly, your friend,

BENJ. F. BUTLER,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, May 8, 1862.

Brigadier-General PHELPS:

SIR: I am directed by the major-general commanding the department of ask if you have seized the Carrollton and Lake Railroad; if you have not, that he desires it to be done, and that pickets be thrown out the shore of the lake, so that schooners and other means are not used to carry or send people away in the direction.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. HAGGERTY,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, May 9, 1862.

To the Mayor and Common Council of the City of New Orleans:

MESSRS: I desire to call your attention to the sanitary condition of your streets. Having assumed, by the choice of your fellow-citizens and the permission of the United States authorities, the care of the city of New Orleans in this behalf, that trust must be faithfully administered. Resolutions and inaction will not do. Active, energetic measures, fully and promptly executed, are imperatively demanded by the exigencies of the occasion. Specially the present suspends on of labor furnishes ample