War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0650 OPERATIONS IN W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., AND LA. Chapter XVI.

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[Document Numbers 20.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 1,

New Orleans, La., April 4, 1862.

Commander WHITTLE,

Commanding Naval Station:

SIR: Would it not be well to place the guns lately arrived for the Navy in position on the floating battery until such time as the Louisiana can be ready to receive them? They would make a formidable addition to the strength of our defenses at the lower forts, and I fear that the Louisiana will not be ready for them in time to take part in the approaching contest.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Document Numbers 21.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 1,

New Orleans, La., April 11, 1862.

Commander WHITTLE,

Commanding Naval Station:

SIR: I have telegraphed General Duncan to send up the 7-inch rifles and three 32-pounder rifles. I regret that these guns have been taken, as in my judgment the safety of this city does not warrant the withdrawal from below of a single gun while so many vessels of war are within the mouth of the river.

respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Document Numbers 22.]

NEW ORLEANS, LA., April 11, 1862.

Major-General LOVELL,

Commanding, &c.:

SIR: I have received your note of this date. You cannot regret more than I do the necessity which compels me to ask the return of the guns loaned you by the Navy, but I am ordered, with emphasis, to send the Louisiana with all dispatch up the river, and these guns are absolutely necessary to arm her partially.

may it not be that the city is in as much danger from above as from below? This opinion, ot would seem, is entertained in a high quarter at Richmond; I mean at the Navy Department.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. C. WHITTLE.

[Document Numbers 22. - Copy of telegram.]

NEW ORLEANS, LA., April 17, 1862.

General RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

After conversation with Commander Whittle we leg beg that Captain Hollins may be allowed to remain in command afloat, at least until he can strike a fair blow at the enemy, which he is ready to do.

M. LOVELL.