War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0649 Chapter XVI. CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS.

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in slowly with shot-guns, for which I am having ammunition made, but we are out of caps; they were to have been furnished us from Nashville, but none came; nor, in answer to all my calls, has anything of any kind been sent here. Yesterday I sent 10,000 pounds of musket powder to Richmond, which leaves me none to make up, and I have no caps. The powder that came from Cuba is all inferior, and has to be revoked, but I can get no slaughter; that which comes from Memphis has been sent to Augusta, and if the raw materials are sent elsewhere, the requisitions must be made in the same direction. With a large fleet concentrating on the coats and a force of the enemy collecting at Ship island it behooves me to commence to make some preparations to defend my own position. In default of any definite information from your part of the country as to your supplies and necessities, I shall be compelled to use my best judgment as to what further can be spared of the supplies that i except to get together. At this present moment I have nothing to send unless it may be a small amount of musket cartridges. i wrote to beauregard to day my reasons for applying everything here to my own use. If you can push some saltpeter here I will try to help you, but you must not rely upon me, as I have deficiencies here to make good before I can send off anything, except upon reasons of the most imperative necessity. Those reasons, if they existed, have been studiously withheld from me thus far.

Very truly, yours,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Document Numbers 18.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 1,

New Orleans, La., March 21, 1862.

Commander MITCHELL,

commanidng Naval Station:

SIR: The concentration of the enemy's ships of war at the mouth of the river induces me to suggest to you the propriety of putting in position at the forts below the two 7-inch rifled cannon lately received from Richmond by you. The heavy guns from Pensacole have mostly been placed on the river above, where the weight of metal against them is less than we may except below. When Tift's vessels is ready for service the guns could be returned, if necessary.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Document Numbers 19.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT Numbers 1,

New Orleans, La., March 30, 1862.

Commander WHITTLE,

Commanding Naval Station:

SIR: I learn that you have four rifled 32-pounder guns, intended for a gunboat not yet completed. As the enemy is collected in force at the mouth of the river, and may attack at any moment, I should like to get the four guns alluded to place temporarily on my boats to assist in repelling attack. They will be returned when your vessel is ready.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.