War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0618 OPERATIONS IN W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., AND LA. Chapter XVI.

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upon her and used before she left New Orleans. There was not time enough to remedy this defect in view of the circumstances.

Question. What length of time would reasonably be required, under the circumstances existing since secession, to built and equip for service such a vessel as the Louisiana? Answer same question as to the Mississippi.

Answer. I have no idea of the time to built such vessels, not being acquainted with the building of such vessels, they entirely new, and not being a naval constructed.

Question. Could Commodore Hollins' squadron, with such other vessels as might have been added, have prevented the enemy's vessels from crossing the bar at the mouths of the river, or when in the river have prevented the passage of the forts?

Answer. My impression is that if Commodore Hollins had been present with his fleet near Fort Jackson when they attempted to pass there, that, in connection with the naval force already there and the co-operation of the forts, they would have greatly embarrassed, if they had not succeeded in stopping, the passage of the enemy's fleet.

Question. In your opinion, was it practicable to save the Mississippi from the time the attack was commenced upon the forts and their passage with the means on hand?

Answer. I do not think she could have been saved.

The following communications were then read to the court by the judge-advocate:

RICHMOND, Va., June 4, 1863.

Major L. R. PAGE,

Judge-Advocate, &c.:

SIR: I respectfully request that the findings and opinion of the naval court of inquiry that has already examined into my conduct as a participant in the defense of New Orleans may be speared upon the record of the military court now investigating the same subject in this city. This request is a made because I understand this later tribunal is authorized to pronounce an opinion upon the conduct of naval officers on duty at New Orleans.

Very respectfully,

J. K. MITCHELL,

Commander, C. S. Navy.

RICHMOND, VA., June 8, 1863.

Major L. R. PAGE,

Judge-Advocate, Court of Inquiry, &c., Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I respectfully request that the findings and opinion of the naval court of inquiry in the case of the destruction by fire of the C. S. steamer Mississippi may be placed upon the record of the military court now in session on this city, as I learn that the conduct of naval officers is authorized to be pronounced upon by said tribunal.

Very respectfully, &c., your obedient servant,

A. SINCLAIR,

Commander, C. S. Navy.

It was thereupon ordered by the court that the foregoing communications be made a part of the record, and that the judge-advocate reply to Commodore Mitchell and Sinclair that this court will recommend that the same publicity be given to the findings and opinion of the naval court of inquiry to in their communications as to the findings and opinion of this court.

The court adjourned to meet at 11 a. m. to-morrow.

RICHMOND, VA., June 9, 1863 - 11 a. m.

The court met pursuant to adjournment.

Present, all the members of the court, the judge-advocate, and Major General M. Lovell.

The proceedings of yesterday were read over.