War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0541 Chapter XVI. CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS.

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ships on the Fort Saint Philip shore, to operate against Fort Jackson. They are placing themselves boldly, with their lights at their mast-heads. You are assuming a fearful responsibility if you do not come at once to our assistance with the Louisiana and the fleet. I can say no more.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. K. DUNCAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Coast Defenses.

Captain J. K. MITCHELL,

Commanding Naval Forces Lower Mississippi River.

[Inclosure N.]

CONFEDERATE STATES STEAMER LOUISIANA, Near Fort Saint Philip, La., April 24, 1862.

GENERAL: On returning to the Louisiana I find that we have no tender on whose steam power we can rely, and many of the volunteer troops on board of the W. Burton are intoxicated. These circumstances, as well as the exhausted condition of our own crew and excessive difficulty in handling the vessel, will prevent our taking the position, at least to-day, that I proposed and was arranged between us this forenoon. I will, however, as you suggested in your communication, take up a position above to protect the approaches in that direction. Having no adequate motive power of our own, it will be an easy matter for the enemy's vessels that have it to take up such a position that our guns cannot reach him for want of elevation or be brought to bear upon him. I will, however, do all I can to keep him back from above. The McRae has lost her 9-inch guns; of course we cannot expect much assistance from her.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. K. MITCHELL,

Commanding C. S. Naval Forces, Lower Mississippi.

Brigadier General JOHNSON K. DUNCAN,

Commanding Coast Defenses, Fort Jackson, La.

[Inclosure O.]

CONFEDERATE STATES STEAMER LOUISIANA, Fort Saint Philip, La., April 24, 1862.

GENERAL: Your second and third notes of this date are at hand. We are in a helpless condition for the want of tug-boats. The W. Burton is crippled and the Landis also, and the gunboat Defiance will not do anything for us. If she comes within my reach I will deprive her captain of his command by force, if necessary. The anchor we have down cannot purchase, and we are afraid to ship it to move about 300 yards higher up, where we can be better secured. We shall probably remain where we are, and do all we can to defeat the enemy should he attack us again. It will be out of our power, I am afraid, to light up the bank below Saint Philip to-night or to set adrift fire boats, as none are at hand and they have all disappeared, apparently.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. K. MITCHELL,

Commanding C. S. Naval Forces, Lower Mississippi.

Brigadier General JOHNSON K. DUNCAN,

Commanding Coast Defenses, Fort Jackson, La.