War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0535 Chapter XVI. CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS.

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NEW ORLEANS, LA., May 13, 1862.

MAJOR: In addition to the foregoing report, I wish to add that upon the arrival of the paroled enlisted men from Forts Jackson and Saint Philip in the city I endeavored, to the best of my ability, to see that they were properly cared for until such time as they could be sent out of town.

As far as it could be done, they were paid in part for the time due, and arrangements were also made through the city authorities and the city safety committee to have them boarded and lodged temporarily, all with the view of preventing them from going over to the enemy through distress and starvation. In this I was very much assisted by Captain M. T. Squires and First Lieutenant L. B. Taylor, Louisiana Regiment of Artillery. Notwithstanding that they were thus amply provided for, scores of them have been daily going over to the enemy and enlisting since, until now there are but a very few left from either fort not in the ranks of the enemy. Although I really did think at the time of the surrender that some few of the men were loyal, the facts which have since come to light have perfectly satisfied me that nearly every man in both forts was thoroughly implicated and concerned in the revolt on the night of April 27, with the exception of the company of Saint Mary's Cannoneers, composed mostly of planters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. K. DUNCAN,

Brigadier-General, late Commanding Coast Defenses.

Major J. G. PICKETT,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department Numbers 1, Camp Moore, La.

[Inclosure A.]

FORTS JACKSON AND SAINT PHILIP, LA., April 6, 1862.

CAPTAIN: Keep your boats in constant readiness at all times for the enemy's approach. Should he attack, all of your fleet must be kept above the raft, and such of your boats as have stern guns should lie in the middle of the stream, above the raft and without the field of our fire, and use these guns against the enemy. Should any boat of the enemy by any means get above the raft, you must instantly ram it with determination and vigor at all risks and every sacrifice. All signal mast-head lights should be kept extinguished at night or never hoisted.

Trusting to your known energy and to the great expectations anticipated of the river fleet by your friends, I have every confidence that your whole duty will be thoroughly performed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. K. DUNCAN,

Brigadier-General.

Captain JOHN A. STEPHENSON,

Commanding River Fleet, present.

[Inclosure B.]

HDQRS. FORTS JACKSON AND SAINT PHILIP, LA., April 9, 1862.

CAPTAIN: Keep one of your boats constantly below night and day opposite the wooded point, where you can watch the movements of the enemy. Signal us his approach and the number of vessels seen coming up, and give me a copy of the signals for our government at the forts.