War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0519 Chapter XVI. CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS.

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desire of the citizens. Shall I come down myself to-night? Will do so if I can be of any assistance, and leave General Smith to complete the organization, and bring down the five regiments when ready. The citizens must decide as to the consequences. I will come, if it is wished, cheerfully.

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major JAMES,

New Orleans, La.

CAMP MOORE, LA., April 28, 1862.

I shall start down myself, with an aide, now, and am perfectly ready, if it is the desire of the city, to hold it to the end. It is for them to say, not me.

M. LOVELL,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major JAMES,

New Orleans, La.

[Inclosure B.]

JACKSON, MISS., May 24, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to report that while I was in the city of New Orleans, on April 27, executing your orders, to assist in removing the Government and State property, and while the negotiations were going on between the city authorities and the Federal officers for the surrender, I was informed that the nature of the replies to the naval commander was such as to throw some censure upon yourself for leaving them, as they mayor styled it, without military protection. I deemed it my duty to advise you of this immediately, the result of which was the inclosed dispatches from you, offering to return with your troops and afford them all the protection in your power, but that the responsibility of any results that might ensue must rest upon the citizens themselves.

I read your dispatches to the city council, which was them in session, in the presence of Mr. Pierre Soule, who happened to be there at the time. That gentleman, who seemed to speak for the mayor and council, most emphatically declared that you ought not to return with your troops, as did also the mayor and members of the council. Several of them, however, declared that they would be glad to have you return alone and see matters for yourself, to which effect I telegraphed you.

You came to the city that evening with a single aide-de-camp and went with me to the mayor's house, where you, in my presence, told him that the citizens of New Orleans should have no cause to say that they were obliged to submit for want of military protection; that you were ready and willing to bring your whole command into the city within twenty-four hours and undergo a bombardment with them if that was their desire; that you had withdrawn to enable the citizens to decide the matter for themselves, as it was they and not you who had their families and property at stake. In reply, the mayor earnestly declined your offer, stating that you had done all in your power, and that it would be a useless waste of life to bring the troops into the city. He also urged you by all means to retire from the city for your own safety, and subsequently asked me to persuade you to leave as soon as possible, as he would be hung if the United States authorities found you were at his house.

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

S. L. JAMES,

Volunteer Aide-de-Camp.

General MANSFIELD LOVELL.