War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0443 Chapter XVI. ACTION ON SANTA ROSA ISLAND, FLA.

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destroy one-half of the tents of the volunteers; they did not spike a single gun, nor do any other injury whatever, except the burning of 30 tents and the capture of some dozen muskets, and of which we have of theirs more than two for one. Our whole casualties are, as stated in my official report, 4 regulars and 9 volunteers killed, 20 regulars and 7 volunteers wounded, and 10 regulars and 11 volunteers missing, and it gives me very great pleasure to state that Surgeon Campbell reports all our wounded as doing well, and he thinks we will not lose a man. Their actual number on the island, by their own acknowledgment, was 1,500 men.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HARVEY BROWN,

Colonel, Commanding.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF FLORIDA, Fort Pickens, October 22, 1861.

COLONEL: I desire to correct an omission in my official report. Captain Henry L. Hoelzle, of the Sixth New York Regiment Volunteers, joined Major Arnold with 10 men of his company and behaved gallantly. Lieutenant Moore Hanham, of the same regiment, commanded the picket guard, and behaved with courage and firmness under a heavy fire, in which most of his sentinels were killed or wounded.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HARVEY BROWN,

Colonel, Commanding.

Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.

No. 2. Report of Major Zealous B. Tower, U. S. Corps of Engineers.

FORT PICKENS, FLA., October 15, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to forward what information I can collect in reference to the forces opposite and their means of attack. The most reliable authority gives General Bragg's forces on the 11th October as 7,000 men. It is also stated that two regiments some weeks since were ordered North, but that General Bragg had refused to let them go, and had asked for re-enforcements. He has eighteen field pieces, six of which are rifled. A party at that time [October 11] were at Pensacola, who had come over to rifle guns.

Between twenty and thirty 10-inch columbiads have been brought by railroad to Pensacola. The person describing them [while looking at our pieces of the same caliber] said that they were straight at the muzzle and were heavier and shorter behind the trunnions, and that they were made at Richmond. He also informed me that as many as eight 10-inch sea-coast mortars had come by railroad to Pensacola.

You will perceive that the armament the enemy received, together with that found at the works, is heavier than ours. I have not heard of other guns, excepting one Dahlgren; but should any heavier guns be cast, the walls of this fort will hardly be able to stand

them even at