War of the Rebellion: Serial 006 Page 0422 COASTS OF S.C., GA., AND MIDDLE AND EAST FLA. Chapter XV.

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in inducing its removal. Should the enemy be successful in his attempt upon Savannah, Augusta will be seriously threatened, and if rapid in his movements it is probable that, in the confusion and panic which would be likely to ensue, much of the cotton would not be removed. I therefore refer to your excellency's serious consideration the propriety of the State authorities notifying the people of the intention of the military commander, in order that such preliminary arrangements may be made for the removal of the cotton should the unfortunate emergency arise, which would otherwise involve serious loss of property.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

Abstract from return of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, Major General John C. Pemberton commanding, for March, 1862.

Present for duty

Troops Officers Men Aggregate Aggregate

present present

and absent

Infantry 1,347 23,146 29,043 34,505

Artillery 100 2,056 2,609 3,167

Cavalry 131 2,249 2,774 3,220

Total 1,578 27,451 34,426 40,892

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 1, 1862.

Brigadier General MAXCY GREGG,

Commanding Fourth Military District:

GENERAL: The general commanding wishes Colonel Dunovant's regiment advanced as skirmishers until they engage the enemy. You will make such disposition of Leake's battery as circumstances may require. He has ordered two 42-pounder carronades to the work at Stony Creek. The general wishes you to keep him constantly advised of the enemy's movements.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. R. WADDY.

P. S.-Move the two Georgia regiments down as far as the work on Stony Creek.

By order Major-General Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Occupy the several causeways [intrenched] and all important positions from Stony Creek to Benton Causeway with one of the Georgia regiments. Keep Leake's battery in hand to occupy any work which may be threatened. Let the mounted troops keep the enemy always in view. If compelled to fall back from Hosper's Creek, burn the boats.

Respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.